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1936 Ford 1.5 ton axle 'upgrade"

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by jack_pine, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. jack_pine
    Joined: Jan 20, 2007
    Posts: 343

    jack_pine
    Member
    from Motor City

    I am planning revisions to my un-molested, clean but tired-out 1936 Ford 1.5-ton stake truck.

    Goal is: Cadillac 390 power, juice brakes, auto trans (cab is small, need column shift for floor space), retain dually axle but install more streetable axle ratio.

    A vendor @ Detroit Autorama said one of his guys had luck with installing different ring and pinion in the dually axle which gave them a 3.54 ratio (IIRC).

    Anybody heard of this? I want to keep the factory axle if possible, but not the 5:1 ratio

    Thanks for reading
     
  2. jack_pine
    Joined: Jan 20, 2007
    Posts: 343

    jack_pine
    Member
    from Motor City

  3. JohnEvans
    Joined: Apr 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,883

    JohnEvans
    Member
    from Phoenix AZ

    I highly doubt that you will find a gear set that is any higher [lower #] that the 5-1 that is in there. 5-1 WAS a fast ratio when that truck was built. You will probably need to use a 1 ton rear out of something in the late 70s up that had a auto trans. Even in the 80s a 1-1/2 ton truck still had high 4s gearing or lower.
     
  4. RMR&C
    Joined: Dec 26, 2009
    Posts: 3,084

    RMR&C
    Member
    from NW Montana

    If you must keep the original rear (mechanical brakes?) best thing would be an OD trans. I would seriously consider updating the rear and brakes though.
     
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  5. jack_pine
    Joined: Jan 20, 2007
    Posts: 343

    jack_pine
    Member
    from Motor City

    Just what I feared - trying to keep the old school look, however, thanks for reading and responding.
     
  6. expavr
    Joined: Jul 28, 2006
    Posts: 78

    expavr

    Check with Chuck Manttiglia - Chuck's Trucks www.chuckstrucksllc.com. I bought a set of 4.10's for my 1940 One Ton from him. That gear set with an O/D or 5 Speed trans makes for a very usable drivetrain where you can take advantage of both low end torque and freeway cruising RPM depending on your need.
     
  7. Shaggy
    Joined: Mar 6, 2003
    Posts: 5,208

    Shaggy
    Member
    from Sultan, WA

    If it was a '38? or newer one ton, you could probably adapt a sprint car quickchange R+P to it with some machining on the pinion, but that is a guess on my part, I know the ring will go in fine, but the pinion like i said would take some work
     
  8. jack_pine
    Joined: Jan 20, 2007
    Posts: 343

    jack_pine
    Member
    from Motor City

    RMR&C - Yes, I definitely was planning to bolt on juice brakes from a, say, '40 &-up
    expavr - Thanks for that URL. I just sent them a note asking about my options. Yes, a 4.10:1 would make for plenty of fun...
    Shaggy - Holy crap would a quickchange look cool. However, I bet those were made for the smaller pass car axle? Just assuming. My truck has a dually axle and I want to keep it that way, (even if I opt for a later model axle)

    Thanks for reading and offering some help.
     
  9. Bbook
    Joined: Jan 23, 2011
    Posts: 23

    Bbook
    Member

    Find an Eaton 2 speed rear end for higher speed cruising. They were available for the '36 1.5 ton.
     
  10. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    Hmm?? If you wanted to go drag
    racing on an 1/8thh of a mile strip,
    that 5.00 to I ratio along with a
    500-inch Caddy would be just the
    ticket!!!!:eek::D Seriously though, I
    doubt you'll find any higher-ratio
    gears to fit that housing. "Back in
    the day", the 5.00 to 1 gear set was
    actually the optional high-speed,
    "highway" ratio for that truck. The
    standard gears were even lower -
    in the 6 to 7-something to 1 range!
    Back then, commercial trucks
    besides having extremely low by
    modern standards, horsepower and
    power to wight ratios, necessitating
    the use of very low gear ratios, were
    also, legally limited to only 45 mph
    on highways) I know you don't want
    to do it, but about the only way to get
    a viable, modern-day highway-usable
    gear ratio will be to swap in a newer
    rearend from a later-model dually
    pickup or cube van.

    Mart3406
    ================
     
  11. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    --------------------
    They were available, but a two-speed
    rear won't help any. Most two-speed
    truck rearends used a 5-somethig to 1
    ratio in high-range and an even lower,
    'super stump-pulling', low-7-something
    to 1 ratio in low range.

    Mart3406
    =============
     
  12. Bbook
    Joined: Jan 23, 2011
    Posts: 23

    Bbook
    Member

    As I look at my manual, I see that the '36 1.5 ton came with either a 6.6 to 1 or a 5.14 to 1 ratio rear end. I saw an Eaton ad for the '36 on ebay that says low range is 6.6 and high range is 5.14. Interesting that the Eaton gives you both of the ratios otherwise available.

    I don't know the ratio on my '36 1.5 ton, but it was originally a bakery truck and I can comfortably do 40 mph, so I think it is the 5.14. I had been hoping to improve that with an Eaton 2 speed, but it appears it won't help. Thanks for the info.
     
  13. Diavolo
    Joined: Apr 1, 2009
    Posts: 803

    Diavolo
    Member

    I'm working with a 55 F600 right now. It has an Eaton 2 speed rear and the numbers are embarrassing. With the tall 2 ton tires and such I am running 3k at 60 mph. I finally opted for a 1 ton diesel dually frame and will eventually swap my current 4.11 for 3.55 unless I go 10 bolt aftermarket (1.5 ton bolt pattern conversion) and get my tire/wheel combination back to close to original specs. I was running widow makers anyway and there was just no where to go unless I grafted the body onto another frame. I opted for a 1 ton because I don't foresee ever needing more than that in my lifetime. If/when that time comes, I will just buy a top kick and be done with it.

    I said all that to say this. I suggest getting a 1 ton frame, doing a 10 bolt conversion for a more appropriate wheel/tire profile, and calling it done. If that seems like too much work, make it a 4X4, put two shortened Dana 60's under the current frame, do the same conversion, box the frame, fabricate custom steering,... a lot of work. Or just get 2X6 boxed tubing and mount custom Dana 60's... or have an axle shop weld 4X4 knuckles on a straight tube and custom shorten a rear axle...

    The older the frame, the less "bendy" it is. I would suggest a frame from the late 60s to early 70s. Newer frames have a deep frame drop for the cab which isn't exactly ideal for a frame swap. If you actually plan on towing, wheelbase is kind of important. The longer the better. My donor frame is 133" and I am frankly wishing for another foot.
     
  14. jack_pine
    Joined: Jan 20, 2007
    Posts: 343

    jack_pine
    Member
    from Motor City

    I had good responses to this a while back, posting it back up in case anybody else has some input.

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  15. hugh m
    Joined: Jul 18, 2007
    Posts: 2,143

    hugh m
    Member
    from ct.

    Check out the quickchange info threads on here, several manufacturers have based their quickies on Ford trucks, like Frankland, and Highland, and they are still fairly common. I will try to post a pic, but just got a new computer.....by the way, these are fabricated units that would look really trick on an actual truck.
     
  16. jack_pine
    Joined: Jan 20, 2007
    Posts: 343

    jack_pine
    Member
    from Motor City

    i ended up having a dually quick change axle built... found a beautiful Frankland cover for it
     

    Attached Files:

    kidcampbell71, RMR&C and H380 like this.
  17. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 5,791

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    NICE! What are the brakes? A guy I met years ago [67/68'] had some where around 36' Ford COE dump truck with a 401 Buick with stock rear axle..Not sure of the trans but may have been Buick auto..Used to surprise the crap out of people but rear end breakage was an issue, had to replace rear end several times..Not sure if he new what actually broke; he was finding whole rear ends some wheres..
     
  18. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,088

    GearheadsQCE
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  19. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,088

    GearheadsQCE
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Seb, The brakes on Jackpine's Quickchange are early '70's Chevy from a dually axle, as are the spindles and hubs.
     

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