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1928 chevy 4cyl motor

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by RedRodder, Apr 7, 2010.

  1. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,674

    MrModelT
    Member

    Mine is just a stock Model A intake manifold that I cut and flipped the intake snout. I did have to add a slightly larger flange for the 1100 though...

    Here are during fab and after:
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,691

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    That's cool. What's the air cleaner?

    -Dave
     
  3. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    Looks like it's from a Hudson.
     
  4. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,674

    MrModelT
    Member

    '56 Hudson Hornet "Twin-H" :D
     
  5. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    Mac - You have any other pics of Cliff Durant's "Baby Chevrolet" Miller? Especially pics from the rear? Cool looking car.
     
  6. Michael,

    I do, and there is also a thread or two on the car and the restoration- am also looking into earlier pics of the car and will share when I find them.

    Bill
     
  7. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    I'm not trying to make this my build thread, just thought you might enjoy a couple pics. The First one everyone should be familiar with and have happened to them one in their adventures with old engines. The second pic is a little more interesting. You can imagine my surprise when i removed the pressure plate from the flywheel and found this.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 892

    Kume
    Member

    a few more. the spring attachment to axles always looked a bit temporary to me on this thing. If you read the available info on this car it sounds a bit like the proverbial axe. Some say it originally had a shortened ford chassis, others a 27 essex chassis. Some that it was built in 1923 etc etc. Looks mainly 27 28 chev now.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2011
  9. Kume- thanks for the new pics of the beach racer!

    I picked up what may be a Ford C crankshaft today- will let you when the banger boys ID it!
     
  10. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    Me too, Thanks Kume for the extra pics. That last shot really shows just how narrow the body and chassis really are.
    Mike
     
  11. youngster
    Joined: Feb 26, 2006
    Posts: 533

    youngster
    Member Emeritus
    from Minnesota

    Here's the story I got on 4 springers. "They wheren't very popular because the body tended to lean too much in the corners. Because of this, the speed had to be reduced to keep them from "Floating" out. This is also the reason most builders used the 3 spring chassis. As the body leaned to the right, the spring on the left would restrict the body sway and your speed could stay higher in the corners."

    Hank Johnson 1899-1982

    This is how Ol' Hank discribed chassis building from the '30's.

    Ron
     
  12. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    I looked at the pics again and in pic #3, right behing the front mounted magneto/distributor, is there some sort of chain drive mechanism? And what does it do? WHat is it's function? If not a chain drive, what is it?
    THanks,
    Mike
     
  13. nickleone
    Joined: Jun 14, 2007
    Posts: 351

    nickleone
    Member

    I havent made it thru all 37 pages yet but I wanted to thro this in the pot.
    R&C had an article in the 70s' that told how to use Triumph TR250 bearings in an A or B block(?) to replace the babit. I dont remember if it was for the rods or the crank.

    Nick
     
  14. NORSON
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 468

    NORSON
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    At the Portland swap meet this weekend I found a set of Bearing inserts that looked like the ones that I saw in the Bob Giovanine videos. Well, after getting them home I think not. But, they are interesting. The guy I bought them from said they were "Model A". He didn't have a clue!! The OD is a little under 2 1/4 and the ID is 2 in. and 1 3/4 in. long. Any one got a clue?
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Yesterday Stevie G, Johnny Speedster, and I visited an older gentleman who owns a homebuilt speedster based on a '28 Chevrolet chassis and running gear- really neat build- THANKS AGAIN JOHN!!!

    I'll post pics when I get a chance- we tried to get it running, but it needs some distributor work.

    Also, Bill Castle and I have been emailing each other over the past week and he has sent LOTS of pictures of Durant's Baby Chevrolet- THANKS AGAIN, BILL!!!

    I'll see if he'll let me post them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2011
  16. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    Mac - looking forward to seeing the pics.

    Herb Kephart - I've been looking at the rocker arms you made/milled. I was wondering what material you used? I've recently come into a bunch of old SBC pistons and some old Model A pistons. If i melted them down and poured them into molds, would the metal be good for rocker arms? I do have a BP and enjoy challenges. Could they be heat treated at home to make them strong enough? I also have access to a bunch of production car aluminum wheels. I think they are t356 or something along that line. They could be broken down and melted also. Your thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  17. SUHRsc
    Joined: Sep 27, 2005
    Posts: 5,079

    SUHRsc
    Member

    I have no relavent info to add here... but I found an Offy rod in my garage...its bent... just to add back to that debate on how they're made
    [​IMG]
     
  18. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 10,020

    RichFox
    Member Emeritus

    Unsolicited opinion. If you melt Ford pistons or some wheels and pour them you get a porous cast aluminum. Go buy a piece of 7075T6 extruded bar stock and cut your rockers from that.
     
  19. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    Zach - thanks for the pic of the rod. It helps me to try and understand what Herb was writing about in making tublar rods.

    Rich - Thanks for the thoughts about pourosity (sp?). But it makes me wonder how it is removed when the aluminum bar is originally created? I wonder what is added to the mix to help remove it? I need to go back to some of the casting sites and ask the question.

    Thanks,

    Mike
     
  20. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,099

    bct
    Member

    just picked up this engine/trans. motor is rebuilt but stuck ....what method would work best to try and free it ....thanks again for all the info in this thread.

    [​IMG]
     
  21. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    There are only eight bolts holding the head in place---I'd remove it and see what was what.
     
  22. youngster
    Joined: Feb 26, 2006
    Posts: 533

    youngster
    Member Emeritus
    from Minnesota

    I've used kerosene poured down the plug holes to free up a stuck engine.

    Ron
     
  23. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 10,020

    RichFox
    Member Emeritus

    You are no doubt familiar with cast aluminum such as intake manifolds and such. Soft, brittle, and porous. When you buy aluminum bar or plate it has been extruded into the shape it is in and possibly rolled further to work it. This process causes the aluminum to be much more dense, and flexible. Other alloys to change the alloy from 2024 to 6061 or 7075 I guess you can look up as well as the heat treat process to reach T4 or T6. When people call a piston "Forged" It is my understanding that it is really pressure cast. Not pounded out of a billet as in a forged steel rod . Hyperutectic pistons have been forced to accept more silicon into the alloy than used to be possible. Makes for a stronger cast piston. All of this is as I understand it and may be wrong.
     
  24. Nice catch bct!

    I put Marvel Mytery Oil and a little PB Blaster in each cylinder and let it sit for a few days... AND I agree with HEATHEN- pop the head to see what's up.
     
  25. Michael_e
    Joined: Mar 15, 2005
    Posts: 431

    Michael_e
    Member

    Rich - Thanks for all the info. I was asking questions on a casting site and they mostly agree. The kind of processes and equipment is not generally available to the backyard metal caster. Backyard casting good for small parts not under those kinds of stresses, like water outlet housings and carb adapters and such stuff. I've just got more time and scrap available than money. Maybe just sell some of the scrap and go buy a length of 7075 like you suggested.

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  26. 39cent
    Joined: Apr 4, 2006
    Posts: 1,569

    39cent
    Member
    from socal

    My buddy had a model A four door with the manifold like that. Ran a 2 bbl stromberg 97, Winfield cam and head, it ran fine, in '59.
     
  27. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,099

    bct
    Member

    Last edited: Apr 5, 2011
  28. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 892

    Kume
    Member

    Chev 4 Parts Suppliers

    Gaskets & pretty much everything you'll need from

    Gary Wallace www.20schevyparts.com
    Filling Station www.fillingstation.com

    There are others like Billy Possum and some good suppliers in Australia

    who else?
     
  29. ebtm3
    Joined: May 23, 2007
    Posts: 837

    ebtm3
    Member

    Mike-

    I milled those rockers from 2024 aluminum bar stock. I think that you would be better off buying the stock from a local supplier--or McMaster Carr --who offer it in less than the 14-16 ft lengths that it comes from the mill.

    Melting down pistons for their alloy can be done--I've done it--but they are high in silicon, and don't machine particularly well. If you do use piston metal to make something, water quench it as soon as you can get it out of the sand (or metal mold)--keeps the grain size small which is beneficial.

    The wheel material might be a better choice BUT BE SURE it isn't magnesium! Some aluminum lawnmower decks (and probably a lot of other castings ) must contain a significant amount of mag. also--old VW aircooled crankcases come to mind

    Melting old castings, even though free, to get material is usually a loser, as to get good metal you should avoid melting in any kind of an iron or steel container (aluminum will become porous). Melt only in a real crucible, use lots of degassing compound, and most importantly clean the metal that you are melting before you put it into the pot. Getting rid of the dirt up front is a lot easier than after it is in a molten state. Cast aluminum has it's place, but in a home foundry environment, your not going to get material that is half the strength of even 6061 bar stock.

    BTW- I put a bronze bushing in the center where they run on the rocker shaft.

    Glad to see that you are thinking of making your own pieces. That's the way it was done in the old days--and when you say "I built this engine" it has a lot more meaning than if you bolted a bunch of bought parts together.

    Any more questions, don't hesitate to ask.

    Herb

    All the material that Rich Fox posted is valid- I hadn't read his post before writing this. Rich knows his stuff ----listen when he talks!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
  30. And it's always worth bending an ear your way as well, Mr. Kephart :)
     

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