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Hot Rods # 10 Track Roadster Build- Marty Strode

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Marty Strode, Jan 24, 2020.

  1. raven
    Joined: Aug 19, 2002
    Posts: 4,619

    raven
    Member

    When you get a chance, could you expound on your body mounting procedure? I’m just not visualizing it.
    r


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  2. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Raven, it will be clear, once the body mounting rails are tacked in place, and the body is removed. I have been getting the rear axle assy ready to install, the housings have been hot-tanked, and blasted. At this time I installed the open drive ring and pinion, had to swap the spider gears from 11 to 12 tooth, to match the 18 tooth 37 axles. IMG_4347.JPG IMG_4348.JPG IMG_4349.JPG
     
  3. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Today, I got the rear spring stretched, and installed, along with mounting the rear axle. Next will come the modifications to the rear arms. Sorry about all of the clutter in the photos. IMG_4350.JPG IMG_4352.JPG IMG_4354.JPG IMG_4356.JPG IMG_4357.JPG
     
  4. AmishMike
    Joined: Mar 27, 2014
    Posts: 458

    AmishMike
    Member

    Very interesting “spring stretcher”. More nice work
     
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  5. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    It comes in handy for quickchanges, with the offset.
     
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  6. hotrod1948
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 466

    hotrod1948
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Milton, WI

    What do you use to spread it? A porta power/inerpac?
     
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  7. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    It uses 1" all thread, and with a 1-1/2" wrench, turn the nuts to stretch the spring, simple and effective. IMG_4359.JPG IMG_4358.JPG
     
  8. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,101

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If Archimedes were around today, I think he'd like to hang out with you;)
     
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  9. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Alan, after your mention of Archimedes, I learned he was born in Sicily, I thought he was from Arkansas.
     
  10. BadgeZ28
    Joined: Oct 28, 2009
    Posts: 1,056

    BadgeZ28
    Member
    from Oregon

    Marty, I have no experience putting power to those old rear ends. Do you think it will live with sticky tires and your trans/motor combo?
     
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  11. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    The weak link is the axle keys, but with skinny 700 X 16's and being somewhat careful it should survive.
     
  12. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,499

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    If it doesn't, we have ways! :p
     
  13. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    I have (2) VW Bus steering boxes in my stash, a ZF and a Ross. After choosing the Ross, I tore it down for inspection, and found it to be in great condition. The plan is to install the steering and pedals this week. One reason for the slow progress is, I am putting the finishing touches on my '40 Pu chassis, getting the rear stabilizer bar installation complete this weekend.

    IMG_4368.JPG IMG_4369.JPG IMG_4364.JPG IMG_4366.JPG
     
  14. studebakerjoe
    Joined: Jul 7, 2015
    Posts: 702

    studebakerjoe
    Member

    Marty, are you going to use one of those bus banjo wheels on it?
     
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  15. Weedburner 40
    Joined: Jan 26, 2006
    Posts: 724

    Weedburner 40
    Member

    Marty, ya shoulda called me before you started on your 40.
     
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  16. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    I know, I know !
     
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  17. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    It's going to get a 40 Ford wheel and column cup.
     
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  18. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 2,293

    RodStRace
    Member

    Mr. Strode, a couple questions, if I may?
    1. I'm sure you got those VW boxes when they were not as valued as they would be today. Is there another alternative that would work and be reasonable if you didn't have these already?
    2. I've seen so many rear stabilizer bars mounted this way (on the axle), but it seems like it would be better to hang it in the chassis and attach to links on each side of the suspension. I realize the unsprung weight savings isn't as great with a complete rear axle, but it just seems like it's 50/50 on mounting but most do it this way. What are your reasons for hanging it on the axle? Easier to control stiffness rather than build it into the Chassis?
     
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  19. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    You are correct, in the 90's I could buy those boxes for as little as $50 bucks, then they went up to $150. With the value of early VW Vans, I don't have any idea what a steering box is worth these days, and never thought of an alternative. As far as the stabilizer mounting, GM mounted the bar to the rear axle on their coil spring applications. One thing I wanted, was a clear path for the tailpipes to route between the shock and the frame rail, ending up, outside the fuel tank. My goal was to limit body roll, created by a transverse spring, and make it a pleasure to drive. In all reality, I probably should have gone with parallel springs, as my buddy Dale (Weedburner 40) would have prescribed, the rolled pan would have hid the rear spring hangers. IMG_3569.JPG IMG_4363.JPG
     
  20. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,101

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Nah, but his nickname was Arky;)
     
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  21. AmishMike
    Joined: Mar 27, 2014
    Posts: 458

    AmishMike
    Member

    More questions about anti-roll bar. Do your other track roadsters have one? Do you notice big difference in handling with or without? Would decrease unsung weight if mounted to frame which in light car might help handling. Do you bend and make the bar? With what material & thickness? Starting build with coil overs & not planning anti-roll bar. Tks
     
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  22. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Mike, we don't use them on the Track Roadsters, with a wide split on the bones, front and rear, 2014-10-14 124717.jpg you don't encounter any body roll. The pictures I posted are my '40 pu. In this shot, notice the body angle, and the inside tires are pretty light.
     
  23. What vehicle did that sway bar come out of originally and or what would you recomend for a 2500lb car?
     
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  24. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    It's is a universal 13/16" bar that a friend of mine uses on a wide range of vehicles. I had to reshape the ends to fit my application. Back when we had a spring shop with a heat treating oven, I would bend 4140 in the Hossfeld bender, cold. Weld paddles on the ends to connect the links, and have them heat treated. It was great to build to suit the application. Not sure, but my '40 pickup should weigh in the area of 3000 lbs. I have a 1" bar for the front and 13/16 on the rear, or 20 percent smaller on the rear. I am sure there are some experts on here that could probably help you, more than me. BTW, where is Salt Lick ?
     
  25. Awesome build, great work bud! Also building a track t, great inspiration!
     
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  26. Graham08
    Joined: Oct 2, 2007
    Posts: 123

    Graham08
    Member

    That's some very clean tube work on the sway bar crossmember and back bumper. You certainly know how to make that Hossfeld talk! Mine is one of my favorite tools in the shop.
     
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  27. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Glad to hear that, can't have too many Track Roadsters.
     
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  28. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,013

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Tube bending is my favorite aspect of scratch car building. With the cost of dies these days, I have been making inserts to add to die radius selection. Simply bend a 180, and saw the tube down the middle, making an insert to bush the die down to the next smaller size, and use the holding and follow shoe of the smaller size. IMG_4370.JPG IMG_4372.JPG IMG_4373.JPG
     
  29. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 3,081

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Member
    from FRENCHTOWN

    I have used early '50s Ford pickup boxes, made by Gemmer. They are also popular upgrade conversion boxes for Model As. I'm not sure if they are any cheaper than a VW box because they are somewhat in demand, but there are a lotta lot of '50s Ford pickups out there that have been upgraded to IFS and R&P so they're around. Shorten the steering shaft to suit (use a sleeve rosebud welded in for safety).

    sr_029_17.JPG SteeringMount01.jpg
     
  30. Stan Back
    Joined: Mar 9, 2007
    Posts: 748

    Stan Back
    Member
    from California

    "Marty, I have no experience putting power to those old rear ends. Do you think it will live with sticky tires and your trans/motor combo?"

    Higher than average tire pressure can help, too.

    2nd Chassis.jpg
     
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