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Technical 10 bolt pinon yoke missing, possible to install without a new crush sleeve?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by drptop70ss, Jan 2, 2020.

  1. drptop70ss
    Joined: May 31, 2010
    Posts: 1,186

    drptop70ss
    Member
    from NY

    Picked up a 67 chevelle 8.2 10 bolt rear, 3:73 posi..previous owner stole the pinion yoke off for a friend and now I have a rear with no yoke.
    So to install the replacement how to do this without messing up the crush sleeve preload? I have zip hands on setting up gears, just watched tons of videos on it. I have never tightened a crush sleeve so I don't know how easy it would be to screw it up, or can I just put on a new nut and tighten it with a 1/2" ratchet and not worry about crushing the sleeve further? Once they start crushing do they get easy to crush or still so much effort I couldn't do it without a breaker bar? Should I gradually tighten to get a certain in/lb reading to turn the pinion?
     
  2. It’s going to be tough now that someone else took it apart, normally I would check rotational torque before taking the yoke off and when putting it back together I would go two or three inch lbs more, without putting a new crush sleeve and resetting bearing preload you are guessing at this point.


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    Nailhead Jason likes this.
  3. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,222

    F&J
    Member

    If you don't want to use a new crush sleeve, (which can be a real bitch to get it to start to crush)...

    Pull the seal and small bearing out, and then I use a thick pinion shim between that bearing and the crush sleeve. Now you can set the "used bearing" specified preload correctly, and as the sleeve now has to crush a bit more, you will also have the nut actually be tight.

    If you only tightened the nut with your 1/2 ratchet without some crushing tension to back it up, the nut will loosen at some point.
     
  4. drptop70ss
    Joined: May 31, 2010
    Posts: 1,186

    drptop70ss
    Member
    from NY

    What about using red loctite on the new nut and tightening down until I get to the high side of a used bearing break away torque? Wouldn't that be the same as if I had a solid spacer in there in place of the crush sleeve? Or you see it loosening up even with the loctite?
    Also just to confirm the pinion rotational torque is set with the carrier installed or out? If out then I may as well pull the pinion and replace the crush collar.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2020

  5. With a new yoke get a new nut.The nut is what keeps it from backing off.A used nut will spin on/off without much trouble.A new nut is made to be slightly tight.It goes on once,and you leave it alone.You might consider using the solid spacer to replace the crush sleeve.It comes with spacers to set clearance.Check Summit for them.
     
  6. Loctite won’t cut it, some service info gives you specs for rotating torque for just the pinion or with the case installed as well. No need to pull the pinion, the crush sleeve will come out the front. New crush sleeves are cheap, just replace it and cruise with peace of mind. Good advice given on replacing the nut as well.


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    alanp561 likes this.
  7. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,316

    squirrel
    Member

    think about what's happening when you tighten the nut, and there is a "good" crush sleeve, or solid spacer, in there. You're compressing the sleeve/spacer between the bearing races, and putting the shank of the pinion in tension. If you don't have a lot of torque on the nut, then this is not happening.

    I know you can "get away" with a lot of sloppy work on this stuff. But I do it right, and I don't have problems.
     
    ffr1222k and 57 Fargo like this.
  8. drptop70ss
    Joined: May 31, 2010
    Posts: 1,186

    drptop70ss
    Member
    from NY

    excellent info, thank you. Now to find the rotational torque with the carrier installed and will order the sleeve and nut from summit.
     
  9. realsteeler
    Joined: Mar 30, 2012
    Posts: 38

    realsteeler
    Member

    In a pinch, you can re -use the old crush sleeve. But first, you need to stretch it out to its former length. Do that by shoving a piece of round bar up the center. Then proceed to flatten out the bulge in the sleeve. No need to get too violent with it.
    Then install and torque up.
     
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  10. OLDSMAN
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,422

    OLDSMAN
    BANNED

    With many years in the automotive repair business I have never heard of this procedure. Thin shins being added I have heard of, but never reshaping the crush sleeve.
     
  11. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,316

    squirrel
    Member

    I would have to pull the axles and carried also, and inspect everything. I've seen too many worn out parts in "good used" rear ends.

    Sent from my Trimline
     
    joel likes this.
  12. Truckedup
    Joined: Jul 25, 2006
    Posts: 4,281

    Truckedup
    Member

    Yup, I have seen to many worn/pitted carrier and pinon bearing races in "good" rear ends...
     
  13. Realsteeler's got the right idea if a new sleeve isn't readily available.

    An old axle shaft of the right diameter also makes a good arbor to slide the old crush sleeve on. Then rotate the sleeve while working around the O.D. with a small hand sledge on the raised portion of the sleeve where the actual "crush" takes place. Don't hammer near the front or rear faces of the sleeve where it contacts the bearing.

    Probably a good idea to also check the height of the sleeve with a mic or dial caliper before starting and check your progress occasionally after a bit of hammering. You'll probably only need to add .020"-.030" in length, if that much.
     
    razoo lew likes this.

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