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1 of 3 remaining supercharged V8 Cords

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by BOOB, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. 31Apickup
    Joined: Nov 8, 2005
    Posts: 2,659

    31Apickup
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Here are some of the cars at the A-C-D museum. I took these last month. The third picture, that Cord was special ordered with the Auburn headlights. The orange and yellow speedster was built for the 1931 New York Auto show.
     

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  2. 31Apickup
    Joined: Nov 8, 2005
    Posts: 2,659

    31Apickup
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Here is a picture of the Miller racecar which won the Indy 500 in 1932. (Also visited the Indy Hall of Fame museum the same weekend), and for comparison a L-29 Cord chassis (at the A-C-D museum). the front drive is pretty similar, Cord had studied the Miller's. The Cord is quite a bit beefier, since it was a much bigger car.
     

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  3. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    The third picture from the right in post 91 was specially built for Robert Stranahan of Champion Spark Plugs. The sign with the car at the museum reads;

    <table id="post5775944" class="tborder" align="center" border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr valign="top"><td class="alt1" id="td_post_5775944" style="border-right: 1px solid #e5e5e5">There were approximately 3000 1936 and 1937 Cords produced but only three of them were hardtop coupes and only one of them was built like this vehicle. Robert Stranahan Sr., President and Founder of Champion Sparkplugs commissioned this one of a kind Cord to be built for himself. There are many unique features in this car including chromed Auburn headlights, a padded leather top, an Auburn hood ornament and LaSalle ventiports on the sides of the hood. After having been used in Ohio and abused in California, the Cord was discovered in Montreal Canada in very decrepit condition by Auburn, Cord, Duesenberg enthusiast Dr. Faye Culbreth. After a multi year restoration, this one of a kind Cord was donated to the museum.
    </td> </tr> <tr><td class="alt2" style="border: 1px solid #e5e5e5; border-top: 0px">
    </td></tr></tbody></table>
     

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  4. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,223

    F&J
    Member

    I looked at a project early 36 sedan about 40 years ago.

    The seller said it was one of the first 50 built for the auto shows, and all were a different custom color with different types of interior material/color. He also said the first 50 did not make it more valuable.

    he did show me some features in the upper cowl that were on the first 50...I recall.


    Any truth to any of that?^
     
  5. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,492

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane


    Thanx Hnstray and Boldventure. I figuerd the "VW type" axles would be the ticket it just looked like the wheels are very "forward mounted" and couldnt see a trans fittin there, but lookin at the chassis picture below all makes sense. Mine are simple curiosisties as im real far away from this type of cars, and i rarely had the chance to look at early 1900s autosmobiles in person.

     
  6. BOOB
    Joined: Oct 1, 2008
    Posts: 535

    BOOB
    Member
    from Taylor, TX

    So it seems Cord was knee deep in the special order business! Lots of one off, single or double digit builds.
     
  7. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    Quoting Josh Malks;

    The first 100 or so Cords were built over a period of several months. Only a small number were finished by the time of the auto shows in November 1935. The rest were completed thru February of 1936. They were assembled mostly from stampings provided by the suppliers of the dies, as part of the contract. Few parts were handmade or pounded out with power hammers as has been written in some places. But the jigs in which they were held for welding were temporary, and the dies had not been finally refined, and some mounting holes were still being cut on individual pieces, so parts sometimes had to be tweaked while each car was being assembled. That's why a fender for one "handbuilt" may not exactly fit another, or a production car.

    All Cords had more hand work in them than many other production cars. That's why I prefer the term "showcar" to describe those first pre-production cars, but "handbuilt" is pretty much the standard appellation now.

    http://forums.acdclub.org/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=597&highlight=handbuilt
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  8. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    The Coppertone Cord By Tom Strongman

    Gordon Buehrigs Cord is often said to be one of the of the most beautiful automobiles ever designed. It's gestation is a story of persistence.

    The famous Cord is based on a design that Buehrig first penned when he worked as a stylist in the art and color division of General Motors under the legendary Harley Earl. Buehrigs design done for a company contest was rejected.

    When Buehrig moved to Duesenberg, he was asked to design a lower cost Duesenberg and he worked up a design based on the one rejected by G.M. It had front wheel drive, outrigger radiators and an aerodynamic shape punctuated with art deco details. The little Duesenberg never happened, but when Buehrig was asked to design a new Cord, he resurrected his design once again. Five prototypes were built for 1935 New York auto show, and the car left showgoers in awe.

    Paul Bryant of Prairie Village Kansas is a retire physics professor from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and a Cord enthusiast of the highest order. He has restored three Cords including the Coppertone Cord. Coppertone, so named because of the copper plating on it's louvers , is one of the five prototypes, and it was shown at the '35 New York Show. Bryant found the car many years ago in Minden Mines Mo.

    Bryant knew his car was a very early model, or perhaps one of the prototypes, because many of it's elements seemed different then standard. He contacted Buehrig about the car and Buehrig asked Bryant to bring the glovebox door to the annual Cord celebration in Auburn Ind. There, Buehrig scratched through the paint on the back of the door and found a deep wine color.

    Buehrig later stopped in Prairie Village enroute to Michigan from his home in Arizona. Upon closer examination of the entire car, he verified that, it was indeed, one of the earliest prototypes, although it had been modified along the way. Bryant asked Buehrig how he should restore it. "Just as I designed it" Buehrig said.

    To that end Bryant worked to bring the car bring the car back to it's original configuration. He copper plated the louvers, made hubcaps without holes and restored the headlights to there side opening configuration.

    Today, Bryants work of many years is complete and on permanent display at he Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum in Auburn Ind.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  9. boffin46
    Joined: Dec 13, 2012
    Posts: 2

    boffin46
    Member

    "he did show me some features in the upper cowl that were on the first 50...I recall."

    On early Cords, you could fill the engine oil and water from an access panel on the cowl. A gauge on the dash gave the engine oil level. Too many people put water in the oil, so they discontinued that feature.

    You can see two black hoses in the engine photo in the post above about the prototype cord.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  10. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    I have been in contact with some Cord scholars regarding the Cord with the Rumble Seat that started this thread. This is what I received in an email from one of them Yesterday;

    You have sent me a really messy tidbit for comment. There is much confusion and inaccurate information regarding Rumble Seat Cords and in connection with the Skater Sonya Hjenie regarding Cord vehicles.

    I will do my best to shed some light in this issue but disclaim any attempt at total accuracy because there are few facts to be had. Based on information which I have access to on Cord Cabriolets with the Rumble Seat option, NONE are known or claimed to be "factory installation".

    On this point, I spoke with Stan Gilliland this morning and he says that it is unlikely that any of the original factory installed Rumble Seat Cabriolets still exist.

    There was a Cord in a California junk yard years ago which was an original factory Rumble Seat car but it was scrapped out with only the Rumble Seat lid having been saved. I tend to agree with Stan. The following are existing cars with Rumble Seats not including the so called Sonya Hjenie car;

    2306F ( Model 810 ) - This car owned by a Missouri collector and has non-factory cut down doors in the style of Darrin. Original engine has been replaced with a supercharged unit and Model 812 external exhaust equipment has been appended.

    1113F ( Model 812 ) - Owner of this car is none other than Stan Gilliland of Wellington, Kansas.

    1446F ( Model 812 ) - Owned in Michigan

    2379F ( Model 812 ) - Owned in Colorado following purchase at May 2005 RM Auctions Meadow Brook event for $236,500. A high valued Cord.
    ------------------------------<wbr>------------------------------<wbr>--------------------
    Here are links to are some pictures of a factory Cord Cabriolet with a Rumble Seat courtesy of the Jim Brockman Collection and the ACD Club website;

    http://www.cordhaven.com/acd/brockman/cord 810-812/JBA154.jpg

    http://www.cordhaven.com/acd/brockman/cord 810-812/JBA155.jpg

    http://www.cordhaven.com/acd/brockman/cord 810-812/JBA155.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
  11. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Seems to me that, about a year ago, Ryan Cochran put on a well-watched thread about the Cord Lycoming V-8, with lots of detailed pix. I'll see if I can find the header so that those interested can reference that, as well as the GREAT discussion on this thread right now.
     
  12. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Turns out, it was ScooterMcRad. The thread is headed, "The Lycoming V8." GREAT info and images of a rare engine, out of the car, so you can see more detail than usual!

    Awesome motors.
     
  13. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    Factory pictures of the only Cord Sedan that was ever built with a rear spare tire.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
  14. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

  15. terrarodder
    Joined: Sep 9, 2005
    Posts: 1,101

    terrarodder
    Member
    from EASTERN PA

    We have a boat tall Cord at the America On Wheels museum now. I'm going there on Wen. nght and will get some pictures to post.
     
  16. Tnomoldw
    Joined: Dec 5, 2012
    Posts: 1,563

    Tnomoldw
    Member

    That is a fine car you have.There was a show room I would visit on occasion located not far from my house.I would stop there on my way to pickup news papers I delivered on my paper route.They had changing Cords and Auburns displayed in the window.In 1957 the cars changed to Edsels. I'll be back with some million dollar hotrod pictures.You may like. :D When the going gets tough ,the tough get going ! Tnomoldw
     
  17. jcmarz
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 4,633

    jcmarz
    Member
    from Chino, Ca

    Now that Cord is a true classic and worth every penny unlike those overpriced muscle cars of the 60s/70s
     
  18. Tnomoldw
    Joined: Dec 5, 2012
    Posts: 1,563

    Tnomoldw
    Member

    :cool:In 1943 it was valued at $200.00 .1944 in Atlanta was sold for $1000.00. It was on the way to Miami.in 2008 it sold for $1.78 million. 2009 the owner died.It was purchased by the family of the origional owner. Why doesn't someone build and drive rods like this? Tnomoldw

    When the going gets tough the tough get going!:D
     

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  19. Nicholson
    Joined: Aug 9, 2006
    Posts: 169

    Nicholson

    Here's a few shots of the Tom Mix Cord supercharged engine. To see some pics of the body and paint restoration you can visit my website. Since the car had never been restored to concours condition it was pretty cool to uncover damage from the wreck back in 1940.
     

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  20. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    Neat website! Thanks for the link.
     
  21. Well spotted.. I'm sayin' repopped plate, even if car's details are correct. It's a question of typographic details on the plate. Thanks for this thread, I like it..
     
  22. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    If I could read the darn thing, I could find out pretty quick if it's a repop plate or not but I can't make out the numbers.:confused:
     

  23. The one in three out of seven number wasn't referring to the supercharged motor, but to the rumble seat option. Most Cords came with trunks, not rumble-seats...

    I wish that I could find the photos that I took this fall of the "Tom Mix Cord"
    It has been restored to exactly the way he had it when he was killed in it, including a six shooter in the holster mounted to the steering column. This truly is a phenomenal car if you ever get a chance to see it, be sure to take it in. I don't know the stories well, but apparently there has been a string of strange deaths connected to the owners of this rare automobile.
     
  24. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
  25. Weasel
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 6,693

    Weasel
    Member

    I don't know how I missed this thread - I must have been on my travels. I had the honour of meeting, chatting with and listening to Dr. Paul Bryant for over an hour at the 2011 ACD Annual Reunion dinner as he explained in the greatest of depth the history of how he restored the 1929 E1 Cord and the Coppertone Cord. This was one of the most fascinating experiences as he recounted every detail, no matter how obscure about the restoration of the cars, their origins and history. He was a walking encyclopedia, a historian as sharp as a tack at 82 years old and a gentleman of immense intelligence, charm and charisma. This will always be remembered as one of the most amazing moments, listening to living history from a 'raconteur extraordinaire'. The whole experience of the ACD Museum is simply fabulous and if you have never been, do not miss this. Sadly Dr. Bryant passed on March 24th 2013. RIP Dr. Bryant....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  26. SUNROOFCORD
    Joined: Oct 22, 2005
    Posts: 2,144

    SUNROOFCORD
    Member

    The First time we went to Auburn in 1966, Dr. Paul Bryant had just barely finished the restoration of his 1936 Cord Cabriolet. His wife Martha climbed in the trunk to sleep and Paul and a friend took turns driving the Cord all night from Kansas to Auburn. Here is an article on Paul's Cabriolet;

    http://www.tomstrongman.com/ClassicCars/PaulBryant810/Index.htm

    Sadly, we are losing too many of the older ACD club members at too rapid of a rate. R.I.P. Paul. You gave us Cord guys a lot over the years. YOU will be missed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013

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