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’33 REO Speedwagon build w/ a twist

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Barn Find, May 6, 2013.

  1. Terraizer
    Joined: Jul 18, 2006
    Posts: 501

    Terraizer
    Member

    C series internationals have steel bed floors like the beds you have. IH pretty much allways has steel bed floors other then in the Knox beds of the K-KB series. Where is that R series Travelall located?
     
  2. rodl
    Joined: Jan 14, 2011
    Posts: 255

    rodl
    Member

    Hey guys, I know this is OT, but I thought you may be interested. This 1933 Reo Flying Cloud was advertised in a local magazine 'Just Cars' ref: JCM3258154
    I can't upload it for some reason. But you should be able to check it out at www.justcars.com.au
    RodL
     
  3. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri


    Ruth, NV
     
  4. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    Thanks Tim. I am definitely proud of pops. This build is way easier than the Auburn. Even though we are tracking down pieces from all over the country, the parts we are finding are in prety good shape. Plus, I think Dad is done building shiny cars. The Auburn was too nice and took all the fun out of it.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    Sorry for letting this thread languish while Dad and I have been distracted by getting all the Diamond Ts running.

    In another amazing streak of luck, Dad located an honest-to-goodness REO pickup bed a few hours away in southern Missouri. The gentleman there had restored one ’37 REO Speed Deliver pickup and was planning to restore another. He was planning to fabricate a brand new bed, and sold Dad the original. The ’37-’38 pickups had different cabs, but very similar beds as the early trucks. Now, we’re in business!

    [​IMG]<O:p</O:p
     
  6. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    For all of you that have patiently waded through these ramblings, the payoff is at hand. I present you.... drum roll....
    The Franklin Olympic Pickup.

    [​IMG]<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
     
  7. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    -----------------------
    Very cool project! Thumbs up on
    everything you're doing! I was just
    thinking too..maybe you've already
    settled on the name..but a few other
    possible phantom "Franklin-esque"
    name possibilities came to mind that
    Franklin might have used, if they
    had ever built a Reo-based Franklin
    pockup like yours.

    "Franklin Air Wagon"
    "Franklin Aero Wagon"
    "Franklin Air Speed"


    or with the last two words merged
    into one:

    "Franklin Airwagon"
    "Franklin Aerowagon"
    "Franklin Airspeed"

    ---------------------
    Mart3406
    ================
     
  8. flynbrian48
    Joined: Mar 10, 2008
    Posts: 6,471

    flynbrian48
    Member

    Looks great, as do the hood trims!

    Brian
     
  9. flynbrian48
    Joined: Mar 10, 2008
    Posts: 6,471

    flynbrian48
    Member

    You know, the Gilmore Musem here has the Franklin Museum in it's own separate building. That truck would look great there...

    Brian
     
  10. T&A Flathead
    Joined: Apr 28, 2007
    Posts: 1,781

    T&A Flathead
    Member

  11. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    Air Wagon- I love it!
     
  12. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,121

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Great looking truck. The long hood really makes it work!
     
  13. Locomotive Breath
    Joined: Feb 1, 2007
    Posts: 711

    Locomotive Breath
    Member
    from Texas

    Very nice, it's turning out great.
     
  14. Wayfarerwalk
    Joined: Mar 11, 2011
    Posts: 30

    Wayfarerwalk
    Member

    +2, along with the swooping fenders, that is some real style.
     
  15. SMOG_GUY
    Joined: Jun 28, 2011
    Posts: 388

    SMOG_GUY
    Member
    from Dinuba

    Only on this website can you find something so interesting! PLEASE go on.
     
  16. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri


    It might look good in the parking lot when we drive it there on a cross-country tour. Hopefully, it is not going to be a static display, but a driver.

    Thanks for all the encouragement.
     
  17. raven
    Joined: Aug 19, 2002
    Posts: 4,619

    raven
    Member

    That is one slick looking truck. Real style.
    r
     
  18. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    Seeing your truck is gonna' drive some
    Franklin people crazy, scratching their
    heads wondering and trying to figure
    out exactly what it is. You could have a
    whole bunch of fun, when. as someone
    surely will - anally points out that your
    truck - or even worse, some particular
    part on it, even "isn't original" :)eek:), by
    really messing with their head and
    telling 'em that your truck is actually
    "completely original
    " and that it's
    "absolutely correct"....because it's "a
    one of only one ever built, experimental,
    'factory prototype'"
    that "almost, but
    never actually made it into production
    ":D:D!!!!
    And with your workmanship and attention
    to detail, and the almost seamless and
    beautifully subtle blending of the Reo cab
    with the Franklin chassis, front sheet metal
    and trim - and given the fact the Franklin
    had also built it's Olympic model using
    Reo bodies at about the same time too,
    could make the "one-off, factory prototype"
    story sound almost believable!<evil grin!=""> (:D'EVIL
    GRIN
    !':D)

    Mart3406
    ===============</evil>
     
  19. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    Yeah, but it's too much fun to tell the story of how we put it together.

    One of Dad's mantras is "Make it look factory". Everybody likes to put their own creative touch on things, but when you make it look as if it rolled out of the factory, then you've created something timeless. In other words, it is less likely to be impacted by passing fads our own poor taste.

    There is a chance that it could show up with Franklin Sales and Service script on it as if it had been a dealer service truck. That fun is yet to come.
     
    todd burgess likes this.
  20. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    The next few posts should prove to be fun, because there are more opportunities for you to weigh with opinions on style details.
    <O:p</O:p
    There is still plenty of work to do, but now we know basically what it is going to look like.
    <O:p</O:p
    What do you think? Does the bed look a little long?

    <O:p</O:pIt is. The ’37-’38 Speed Wagon bed is 4 inches longer than the ’34-36 bed. The ’34-’36 trucks had a 70-inch bed, which already had quite a bit of rear overhang. Dad considered sectioning this bed, but has opted against doing so. The tailgate on this bed slopes in toward the top, so it is only 2 inches longer along the top. Dad’s not planning on painting this truck. He is done building shiny cars. He could disguise his sectioning , but the work entailed in cutting up a good original bed just doesn’t seem worth the reward of two less inches. Now, he will have to fix the side panels so you can no longer see the bolt pattern for the ’37 fenders. Another rationalization for leaving the longer bed is that the Franklin hood is well over 4 inches longer than the REO hood, so this truck is adding proportions to both ends. Perhaps that maintains balance? Opinions are welcome on a short bed vs. leave it as is. Pretty sure this is how it is staying. You can add to our confidence that this is the right move and you won’t offend anyone by suggesting otherwise.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]<O:p</O:p
     
    oldtymehiboy and kidcampbell71 like this.
  21. rodl
    Joined: Jan 14, 2011
    Posts: 255

    rodl
    Member

    I reckon the front to rear balance looks fine. Losing 2" off the tail is one heck of a lot of work for something that probably would make little or no difference in appearance.
    BTW Great effort by your team. :D RodL
     
  22. BuiltFerComfort
    Joined: Jan 24, 2007
    Posts: 1,620

    BuiltFerComfort
    Member

    I like the proportions. I'm wondering how you'll tie the rear fenders to the bed. I'm also wondering if the 80-year-old wire wheels are going to be ok but I bet you've thought of that.

    The one suggestion would be to add more/bigger tail lights to the back of the bed or rear bumper. Make them removable if you want, but those tiny, stylish stock lights are not enough these days. Unless you are directly behind you can only see one of them.
     
  23. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,305

    ehdubya
    Member

    I think the proportions are fine and easily pass for factory look. As long as you don't put orange motorcycle turn signals on it it's going to look great.
     
  24. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,121

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Leave the bed long, it looks perfect with the long hood. Give it a rear bumper that goes with the style of the front and mount some appropriate vintage taillights under the tail gate like the green truck and it should be fine. I know you say he's through with building "shiny cars", but it really needs to be all the same color with some sort of logo on the doors. I'm not a fan of fake patina, but it needs to look like a survivor and not a bunch of parts from different vehicles put together.
     
  25. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    Yeah, Dad has been concerened about that. The doors for instance concered him. He kinda wanted to use the doors from the Shaniko truck, so the surface rust would match. I encouraged him to use the best parts he had and worry about the surface finish later. I've looked at it so long, the green and orange and yellow and black and gray and white all meld like a lot of old trucks I've seen beat around. He definitely has to take care of the primered are that shows the outline of the '37 truck fenders. I'm confident he'll figure out how to tie it all together.

    As proof, I offer this photo of the late '31 Model A he built. This truck was built entirely from pieces. He took just as much care to match the look on each individual panel as some guys take to strip and paint sheetmetal. If you look really close in this photo, you might be able to see where he disguised the new sheetmetal on the bottom of the cab, doors, and cowl. It actually shows up more in the photo than it does on the street. BTW, It's the tightest, quietest, fastest Model A we've ever run.

    [​IMG]
     
    kiwijeff and kidcampbell71 like this.
  26. Barn Find, I'd like to know more about making hood ornaments out of babbit. I am also working on a project that never was, but could have been.
     
  27. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    He's done silicon bronze casting for quite a while. That is a lot of work. The babbit is just a lot easier to work with, beucase the melting point is so much lower. He sorta discovered the method by accident. I don't know how durable it is, or if you can plate over it? He uses the same little electric crucible he bought to poor Model A crankshaft bearings and just used left over bearing material. He made a wooden mock-up of the part. I'lll have to ask if he used the same sand for the mold as the bronze casting. I think so.
     
  28. BuiltFerComfort
    Joined: Jan 24, 2007
    Posts: 1,620

    BuiltFerComfort
    Member

    There was a tech week thread on pewter casting too. Pewter comes out shiny after polishing.
     
  29. Jungle Jalopy
    Joined: Mar 31, 2010
    Posts: 221

    Jungle Jalopy
    Member

    Great job and a very entertaining build thread. Looks great. I think the proportions are right on. Long hood, long bed. The only thing making it look a little off are the white doors. Shiney can be nice but I totally support your dad's love of aged metal. I used to do a lot of patina work at our metal fabrication shop. Not always to make thing fake-old. It just looks neat. Lots of gun blued steel and bronze mostly. Our chemicals came from Birchwood-Casey. Sometimes our job would be to match some existing work. We would jump through a lot of hoops to make things pass as old. Here's a trick that might work on the doors. Paint them the color (or two) the cab used to be Give them a light mist with the sand blaster. Just enough to pit them a bit. Squirt or wipe warmed up gun bluing on them and vary the darkness with a grey Scothbrite pad by hand (a gloved hand). Wash it down with water to stop the action. You could then let it go a little rusty or not- vinegar would speed it along. When you get it looking right give it a "wipe on, wipe off" with 50/50 Penetrol-Denatured Alchohol for a little added matte depth and some amount of sealing.
     
    oldtymehiboy likes this.

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