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Tech week; Rottenleonard's scratch built doors

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rottenleonard, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Wa hoo I love tech week..... Thanks Baileigh!!!!

    I think there are some people that could use this, Whether they have an oddball body that is hard to find door for or a model a that re pops are made for but will set you back a stack of cash( I'll have less than 100 dollars into both doors and what you will see took me one day)

    Now what I'm working with is a 28-9 roadster back section and a pickup cowl(hey who's hissing?) I want to make one body to take to the Portland swap meet next month to sell with the proceeds going to my model a 5 window body fund. The roadster body had been hacked up pretty severely but I think I can make something someone could make a cool rod out of cheap!

    Here we go; Start by figuring out how thick the jam blanks need to be, Mine is going to have three inches on the inside of the door, three in the jam and 3/4" setback from the door edge.

    [​IMG]

    next take and cut a blank and bent 90 degrees to form the inside corner of the door

    [​IMG]

    take that blank and clamp it to the door jam

    [​IMG]


    and then trace the door opening on to it

    [​IMG]


    next used dividers to make a line for the set back(mine is 3/4")

    [​IMG]


    and cut that line


    [​IMG]



    now off to the bead roller with a set of tipping dies, If you don't have a bead roller you could use flanging pliers.

    [​IMG]


    roll the body line in several steps

    [​IMG]


    notice how wavy this makes the flange

    [​IMG]

    plannish out the waves (sort of like tuck shrinking)


    [​IMG]


    Now you will find that the flange caused the piece to bow


    [​IMG]

    Here you will need to shrink the flange, you could use relief cuts or tuck shrinking but I'm going to use my shrinker. ( notice where it's made, probably the best piece of info on this thread is if you are thinking of buying one like this save you money for a baileigh, as this one is not worth the poorly refined scrap iron it's made out of)

    [​IMG]

    now that my rant is done back to shrinking the flange, just go a little at a time and check with a straight edge

    [​IMG]

    here is the piece refitted to the jam

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    to be continued( i had gotten almost this far and hit the wrong button and lost it...I love computers:D)
     
  2. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Next we just rinse and repeat for the rear jam

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Next was to make the bottom of the door, it starts out in the same fashion but the setback will be 1 1/2" to allow for a splash guard under the door. you can see where it goes on the cowl.

    [​IMG]

    just measure the same way. because of this mismatched bastard child my door is tapered on the bottom, this is o.k. but needs to be accounted for. If you aren't doing something weird like me these measurement will probably be the same.

    [​IMG]

    To save time I bought a door skin for a model a pickup, they are dirt cheap and I don't have a English wheel to make skins.
    I have used a method to make skins that I got off the professor hammer article in classic trucks for making a compound curve in flat sheet metal, here are some picts from my Chrysler build

    you make a grid on your sheet and planish with a hammer and dolly at each intersection, this stretches the metal and makes the compound curve, It worked well, and is very controllable, but requires time and a skim coat of filler to remove the hammer marks

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Anyways back to our current victim, Right or wrong I used the bottom of the door skin to find the curve of the bottom of the door. keeping in mind the offset measurement take previously

    [​IMG]


    then followed the procedure from the sides


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Now I needed to fold over the flanges on the skin and that is pretty straight forward.

    just tap it down over a dolly

    [​IMG]

    in a few steps

    [​IMG]


    leaving just enough space to slip in the door frame

    [​IMG]


    now it is time to start fitting the frame

    with the bottom installed and the side layed over the top you can start to figure out how to trim the pieces to make this work,

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    the bottom piece gets trimmed first for the 3/4" setback of the front and rear pieces.


    [​IMG]


    this allows you start fitting the side, lay it over the bottom and trace to make your cut line

    [​IMG]

    here it is trimmed on the end and overlapped with the bottom

    [​IMG]


    next cut one at 45 degrees, then reinstall and trace the other to make a tight joint

    [​IMG]


    cut the other

    [​IMG]


    starting to look like something

    repeat on the other end

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    clamp it all together

    [​IMG]


    and reward yourself with some teasers

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    next it's back to the bench for welding, use a lot of small tacks to keep warping down and grind flat.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  4. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Now for the body line

    [​IMG]

    I started out by cutting a blank and bending about 70 degrees


    [​IMG]

    Then 3/8" from there bent an opposing angel, then measured the width of the style line and bent 90 degrees to form the top of the door.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I put that aside and formed a 90 degree angle piece to make the inside top portion of the door.


    [​IMG]

    then cut and trimmed just like the sides and bottom


    [​IMG]

    next stand the door up upside down, lay a sharpie flat against the door skin and trace a line

    [​IMG]

    the sharpie makes it's mark 1/4" from where you need it

    [​IMG]


    so now you need to use the dividers to make a cut line that is 1/4" plus the width of the style line upper flange away from the line you just traced, and then cut.

    [​IMG]

    now use whatever shrinking method to shrink the flange on the style line piece to match the door structure, You will need to use your English knee a little to adjust it.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    next fit the piece as needed, panel clamps rock!

    [​IMG]

    and tack it into place

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    trial fit........... Don't you hate it when the reality of something doesn't work the way you had it drawn in your head.:eek:

    [​IMG]


    I'm not sure what I was thinking but I guess that happens, out comes the cut off wheel for a redo.

    This time I used a 3/16 step die on the bead roller and that made the style line a lot more appropriate, then refitted the new piece in the same manner as the incorrect one, I also had to trim back the top inner structure

    re fitting much better

    [​IMG]

    tacking in

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2011
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  5. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    continued

    [​IMG]


    permanently attaching the inner structure

    [​IMG]

    and filling the ends of the style lines with weld

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Those pictures aren't blurry, you have just been drinking:p

    back onto the car for some reward shots

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I will move on to the other door and other projects as I periodically come back to this door for spot welds, I find that this helps with patience and keeping the panel cool to avoid warping.

    [​IMG]

    This was all done in one day and was defiantly a (good enough for the girls we date) project, that could be slowed down and refined for better fit and finish. The more effort you put into it will be reflected in the final product. but all of the principles would be the same. I used 20 gauge for the whole door, which seems flimsy but once everything is together the door is light and VERY stiff. I will add inner supports where the hinges will be mounted to stop cracking other than that I think it will work well and looks a little more "right" than making doors from box tube.

    I hope this helps someone, I'll come back and post more pictures here as the body progresses Thanks Rottenleonard
     
  6. Hot Rod Ron
    Joined: Mar 7, 2001
    Posts: 2,745

    Hot Rod Ron
    Member

    Great post with nice photos.
     
  7. HotRod33
    Joined: Oct 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,216

    HotRod33
    Member
    from Arnold MO

    You made it look pretty easy...... nice tech article...... I'd vote for you just send me the doors........
     
  8. Wow, that's amazing work.:cool:
     
  9. chrisntx
    Joined: Jan 20, 2006
    Posts: 1,761

    chrisntx
    Member
    from Texas .

    thank you Leonard!
    this kind of post is the biggest reason I come to the HAMB
     
  10. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Hell let's make a deal and i'll send the whole car:D
     
  11. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 1,437

    bct
    Member

    nice work leonard. funny thing, i'm working on my plasma tracer today.all the best. keep up the good work.
     
  12. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I wondered if anyone built one, post some pics.
     
  13. HotRod33
    Joined: Oct 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,216

    HotRod33
    Member
    from Arnold MO

    Thats just what I need another project........... I already have more projects than I will get done before I die........ LOL
     
  14. JeffreyJames
    Joined: Jun 13, 2007
    Posts: 16,382

    JeffreyJames
    Member
    from SUGAR CITY

    Nice work!!! You get my vote for tech week winner as you could put some of the metal working tool to goo use!
     
  15. Kevinsrodshop
    Joined: Aug 22, 2009
    Posts: 534

    Kevinsrodshop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Nice work! Tech week is the best.
     
  16. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 1,437

    bct
    Member

    here ya go...pics
    just about there...used a salvaged awning frame for material

    [​IMG]

    48? ford panhard bar ends the plaz tip fits good just have to cut them so they will pinch second one for stylus

    [​IMG]

    i can't tell you how many squares i've ruined by nicking them with the plaz. i think that it will get the most use without a pattern , just useing the upper bar for straight cuts. thanks for the step by step.peace
     
  17. Ian Berky
    Joined: Nov 28, 2007
    Posts: 3,643

    Ian Berky
    Member

    Great tech man!!! Super talented and creative!!!! Rules!!!
     
  18. studog51
    Joined: Jul 30, 2008
    Posts: 929

    studog51
    Member

    awesome tech piece.... very easy to follow...thanks and good luck
     
  19. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 4,344

    Atwater Mike
    Member

    Good down to earth fab...without a wheel. Good thinking. Grid idea is a good idea.
    Inspiring...
     
  20. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 321

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Amen to that!

    As soon as I get done with my '36:
    [​IMG]


    Awesome stuff!
    Thanks!
     
  21. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    BCT,
    Thats cool, you will think of more and more uses for it when you have it working. I like the re-purposed parts!
     
  22. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That would be the toughest decision I'D LOVE TO MAKE:p

    It works surprisingly well, great way of "getting by"
     
  23. Zerk
    Joined: May 26, 2005
    Posts: 1,301

    Zerk
    Member

    This is everything a tech article should be. It covers a definite need, has clear text to explain the steps, and great photos to make the job clearer and make me think, hey, if I just cleared a space in the garage, I could do that:rolleyes:
     
  24. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 3,334

    pitman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Hampsha

    Beautifully explained. Just the right pics to give it a shot! Thank you.
     
  25. chrisntx
    Joined: Jan 20, 2006
    Posts: 1,761

    chrisntx
    Member
    from Texas .

    What brand car was this back half?
     
  26. blackout
    Joined: Jul 29, 2007
    Posts: 1,976

    blackout
    Member

    Great tech, thanks for posting.
     
  27. violet springs
    Joined: Apr 2, 2006
    Posts: 380

    violet springs
    Member

    Great tech.
    What are the pieces on the floor?[​IMG]
     
  28. falconsprint63
    Joined: May 17, 2007
    Posts: 1,807

    falconsprint63
    Member
    from Mayberry

    mad skills. again I state--"I'm not winning tech week"
     
  29. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,113

    rottenleonard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER


    They are some seats that I make and sell on the bay to support my hot rod habbit
    [​IMG]
     
  30. HotRod33
    Joined: Oct 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,216

    HotRod33
    Member
    from Arnold MO

    you need to sell those seats that you make here on the hamb in the classifed section......... Those are pretty nice....
     

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