Register now to get rid of these ads!

Sheet metal vs. Body panel gauge???

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by STRANGERODZ, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. STRANGERODZ
    Joined: Dec 20, 2009
    Posts: 52

    STRANGERODZ
    Member
    from WASHINGTON

    Hi, I would like to know if there is a differents in body panel steel and mild steel?? If a car hood is 18ga and a peace of 18ga sheet metal is the same. Way will one have louver punch in it easyer than the other. Is car steel mild, cold rolled or hot roller. Can any one please HELP?? Thanks..:confused::confused:
     
  2. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,822

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

  3. 1Bad67
    Joined: Mar 22, 2006
    Posts: 216

    1Bad67
    Member

    Type of steel, not the thickness, is probably the main difference. I think they use a type that is easier to form for body parts.
     
  4. metalfaber
    Joined: Feb 2, 2011
    Posts: 218

    metalfaber
    Member
    from Nebraska

    Cold rolled sheet is what you want, 18, 19 or 20 gauge is best for bodypanels. Cold rolled is rolled and formed cold, hence the name, and it has tighter tolerances and a nicer slag free finish. Hot rolled is rolled while hot, and then ends up with slag on it. If you take a piece of cold rolled and hammer it over in the vice, and take a piece of hot rolled, you will see the crap pop off of the hot rolled.

    Use cold rolled for sheetmetal, and you can take your pick on thicker stuff for brackets, frame parts, etc. There are several other options for the thicker material, such as P&O (pickled and oiled) which is basically hotrolled with some things done to it afterwards to improve its appearance.

    To sum up for you, a car panel should react the same as cold rolled, unless you get a newer car that has some of the high strength steel in it, but I very well doubt you will, as that is also on in certain structural areas of the cars anyways, and it is new.

    Probably more than you wanted to know. LOL

    Brian =)
     
    Register now to get rid of these ads!

  5. STRANGERODZ
    Joined: Dec 20, 2009
    Posts: 52

    STRANGERODZ
    Member
    from WASHINGTON

    THANKS, guy. That's a lot of help..
     
  6. 65COMET
    Joined: Apr 10, 2007
    Posts: 2,982

    65COMET
    Member

    I am a retired sheet metal worker and we used 21 gauge cold rolled metal made for forming body panels,much more plyable,on all our custom body panel products. ROY.
     
  7. 61 chevy
    Joined: Apr 11, 2007
    Posts: 892

    61 chevy
    Member

    cold roll is stronger than hot roll when it comes to bending it
     
  8. jimvette59
    Joined: Apr 28, 2008
    Posts: 568

    jimvette59
    Member

    With out going to it cold rolled is more pliable as per specs.
     
  9. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 6,557

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    If you are looking for good sheetmetal for forming body panels, 19 ga. AKDQ is the type favored by many pros. The AKDQ is short for "aluminum killed, draw quality". Yes, we're talking steel, not aluminum, that just refers to the mill process and the "draw quality" indicates it's greater stretchability for being drawn into or over dies without tearing. That is, of course, an equally a beneficial quality when hand forming panels.

    Ray
     
    29AVEE8 likes this.
  10. STRANGERODZ
    Joined: Dec 20, 2009
    Posts: 52

    STRANGERODZ
    Member
    from WASHINGTON

    Lots of good stuff. Thanks
     
  11. trp3141592
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 8

    trp3141592
    Member
    from Michigan

    Hi Guys,

    Very helpful. I need to repair splotchy rust-through cancer on the LR door on my Cord. The door skin feels thin overall, so I think I a will be using 19 to 21 gauge cold rolled steel. Any other suggestions?
     
  12. john worden
    Joined: Nov 14, 2007
    Posts: 607

    john worden
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from iowa

    I'd bet the outer panels on your Cord are 18 or 19 ga. 21 ga. will test your welding skills more as well.
     
  13. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 30,951

    porknbeaner
    Member

    There are different grades of steel be it hot rolled or cold rolled. So how it punches depends on the grade or carbon content of the metal. Most of what you buy in the metal store is mild steel and will form and punch just fine. But you can buy higher carbon content if you like.

    What you want for body panels or patch panels is going to be 18 gauge mild cold rolled steel in most instances. Some racers or people who are being weight conscious will opt 20 gauge and work with it to lighten things up. One should stay away from alloys if at all possible.
     
  14. trp3141592
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 8

    trp3141592
    Member
    from Michigan

    Thank you, gentlemen.
     
  15. Kiwi Tinbender
    Joined: Feb 23, 2006
    Posts: 876

    Kiwi Tinbender
    Member

    Be aware that there are many differences in both thickness and hardness in the cold rolled sheet available today. I have seen 18ga vary in thickness from .040 to .045, and the construction of the sheet can change alot depending if you get U.S. or Chinese product. There is also 19ga available, but harder to get and more expensive. Try and find a section of the vehicle you are working on that is still `as stamped` and measure its thickness. As an aside--I have just pancaked a `41 International Pickup (sectioned 2'' out of the roof crown above the doors, and chopped only the windshield 1 1/4'' ) and the steel used to stamp those pieces when new is among the best, most workable of all the old bodies I have come across......Get something as close to what you have as you can. Then try to do the best repair possible. Lapped welds, Mig tacks and Bondo in large quantities are not great examples of that, but everyone has to start somewhere.....
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2013 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.