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Having stencils made for shop truck door.. Tell me what you think

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Chopperman, Aug 24, 2008.

  1. Chopperman
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 1,179

    Chopperman
    Member

    I like em

    The actual stencil won't have as much detail on the torches as they will most likely have to be totally blacked out.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. stude_trucks
    Joined: Sep 13, 2007
    Posts: 4,757

    stude_trucks
    Member

    Looks good, but I say keep as much detail as possible - looks great like that. What about silk screening them on or having somebody hand paint it?
     
  3. Juztyn00
    Joined: Jul 21, 2007
    Posts: 189

    Juztyn00
    Member

    who painted the belt on the blower of your dads car? Could you have them do it? If you do use a stencil, at least have someone outline everything with a pinstripe brush.
     
  4. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 29,861

    Tman
    Member

    Font looks like generic Mall T-shirt shop fodder.
     
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  5. LOWCAB
    Joined: Aug 21, 2006
    Posts: 1,877

    LOWCAB
    Member
    from Houston

    What kind of stencil are we talking about? Machine done, hand cut? I agree on the font style also. Will lots of detail be lost on the lettering also? From a readability standpoint it is a bad font choice. The fancy scroll to the first Caps on the wording makes the image off balance. Also if the torches are to be "totally blacked out" the recognition of them also gets shady.
     
  6. Tbomb428
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 491

    Tbomb428
    Member
    from SoCal

    Well, you asked. I think the font is too frilly for a metal-fab shop. Steel, cutting, welding, noise, heat, sweat. That font say's none of that.
     
  7. Del Swanson
    Joined: Mar 27, 2008
    Posts: 711

    Del Swanson
    Member
    from Racine, WI

    I agree. It'll be too hard to read further than a few feet away. The three cardinal rules of sign painting, readability, readability, readability! I like the torches though.
    Del
     
  8. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,471

    budd
    Member

    i'm not keen on the X torches, put something in the middle that you have done/built. what ever font you use it should be clear from a long way off.
     
  9. Sage
    Joined: Apr 8, 2008
    Posts: 111

    Sage
    Member

    By "stencil" are you referring to a hand-cut stencil board (like we all remember from school & that silly look-what-I-did-to-my-walls-at-home crap) or do you mean paint "masks"? There is a huge difference in both application and finished effect.

    A "stencil" is essentially a board (stencil board, cardboard, masonite, whatever) that you would place over a surface and then either spray through or pounce upon with a stencil brush. A paint mask on the over hand can be quite different even though it produces pretty much the same end result. Because most paint masks are produced by plotters (vinyl cutters) onto self-adhesive vinyl they can be much more intricate (and don't have that inherent problem stencil's have of needing "bridges" to hold the centers of things in place).

    Or do you really mean vinyl signage?

    Based on your attached image, and because it has "closed" loops in the lettering, I'm guessing you mean vinyl signage. If that's the case, I'd suggest as stated above that you find yourself a local sign guy (or two or three) with some knowledge of design and see what he / they come up with. I agree with Tman, LOWCAB & Tbomb428...the font doesn't at all fit the business application. Also, one of the cardinal rules of good sign design has been violated: NEVER PLACE ITALISED FONTS ON AN ARC! On the top arc the leading letter is almost upright while the ending letter is falling over. No offense, but you might as well have used all upper case Old English (another sign no-no).

    I've cut tons of paint masks with my plotter (it's the primary thing I use it for ~ no vinyl lettering for me) and I know from experience that any decent plotter will easily cut all of the detail in the torches with no problem. I've cut stuff as small as 1/4" tall lettering.

    Seriously, give it some more thought. But then what do I know? I've only been making my living doing signs for the past 39+ years. Just remember, you asked, "Tell me what you think?"
     
  10. Chaz
    Joined: Feb 24, 2004
    Posts: 3,973

    Chaz
    Member

    Well, you asked. IMO the lettering is too hard to read and too girly. The idea of a graphic is to be seen and easily read.
    Same with the torches. I had to look closely to see what they were. The whole trhing needs to be heavier and more understandable with a quick glance.
     
  11. dannyego
    Joined: Mar 12, 2008
    Posts: 1,363

    dannyego
    Member

    Would look good on a t-shirt, bad on a door.
     
  12. Chopperman
    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 1,179

    Chopperman
    Member

    thanks for th input guys. I usually use OLD E when doing my lettering and was going for something different.

    Going back to the drawing board. Torches are staying though :D
     
  13. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,964

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    I'd go with one of those cheepie projectors that will blow up an image
    to five-ten times its' size, shoot the image onto the door shell and paint
    all of the detail you want into the signage. All of those vinyl or computer
    generated masks are kinda bullshit for a one-off deal, unless you 'got money to smoke, most look like a stencil, as well!
    The round hand script isn't, as pointed out, a great choice, but can be
    improved by inlargement. I like the torches, as well!
    Hell, any half-assed sober pinstriper should be able to clean this up for you, onced ruffed in.

    Swankey Devils C.C.

    "Meanwhile back aboard The Tainted Pork"
     
  14. BadLuck
    Joined: Jan 7, 2006
    Posts: 3,047

    BadLuck
    Member

    I agree with picking a different font for the letters....when we designed a logo for my business, we made the mistake of picking a cool looking "tribal" type lettering. We had my truck, trailer and t-shirts done that way. About the second month of "what does that say" we changed the style of letter to one that was easily read from a distance. Big difference! Just something to think about. Like the torches!:)
     
  15. Cajun Kenny
    Joined: Aug 27, 2007
    Posts: 7,661

    Cajun Kenny
    Member

    go with the black and white! switch to old english lettering..haha!
     
  16. chaddilac
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 13,261

    chaddilac
    Member

    I would choose a more manly font... and you might trade out a torch for a hammer. You probably wouldn't be caught in the shop using two torches at the same time?

    Old English is too hard to read. Do something different.

    Let me know if you need a little help.
     
  17. kustombypook
    Joined: Oct 12, 2002
    Posts: 684

    kustombypook
    Member

    The Old English lettering sounds good, and I like the idea of keeping the torches, but with 2 of them, they are too small to distinguish from a distance. Why not try using 1 old torch. Like this maybe.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Kustom7777
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 5,065

    Kustom7777
    Member

    old english is too hard to read,,,,,,and way overdone,,,,there are tons of cooler fonts out there,,,
    i think there is a site called house industries that has TONS of cool retro style fonts,,,,

    if you're keeping the torches,,maybe have a little blue flame coming out,,
     

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