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History East Coast '40

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Ryan, Oct 26, 2009.

  1. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 15,077

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

  2. NITROFC
    Joined: Apr 17, 2001
    Posts: 6,195

    NITROFC
    BANNED

    Nice piece of history ...Thanks
     
  3. M.Edell
    Joined: Jun 5, 2009
    Posts: 3,984

    M.Edell
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    Alot of the older guys here in California who were Hot Rodders in the 50's and 60's seemed to always clown on East Coast style cars.
    The East Coast styling to me ranges from very interesting and cool to What the Hell were they thinking? lol..thats just my opinion.
     
  4. HotRodBen1987
    Joined: Jul 29, 2009
    Posts: 691

    HotRodBen1987
    BANNED

    Nice write up. Makes me wanna go out west and compare those cars to all the east coast ones I've grown up around.
     
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  5. Rikster
    Joined: Dec 10, 2004
    Posts: 5,690

    Rikster
    Member

    Great car.... And I'm happy they put a hood back on the car. Looks so much better with the hood.

    Good to hear a Hamber got it.

    Here it is with the Nash grille...

    Photo from Cool Cars Square Roll Bars
    [​IMG]


    And here is the Honk August 1953 Article

    [​IMG]
     
  6. hombres ruin
    Joined: Nov 21, 2006
    Posts: 3,120

    hombres ruin
    Member

    A really killer ride,i love the proportions,and the stance.it would be great to see it lay a little lower,but a great piece of history.
     
  7. SuperFleye
    Joined: Jul 17, 2005
    Posts: 1,739

    SuperFleye
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    Nice car thanks for sharing the story!
     
  8. James D
    Joined: Feb 8, 2007
    Posts: 4,053

    James D
    Member

    That "thoughtless" chop really works somehow. Who´d a thought?
     
  9. hugh m
    Joined: Jul 18, 2007
    Posts: 1,962

    hugh m
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from ct.

    Your point about the aircraft industry is well taken. Seems like, wth the exception of a few east coast coach builders, most of the really nice metal shaping came from aircraft style skills. Plus there were lots of race shops out west using the same technology. (Never quite got the nice weather arguement.)
     
  10. robt500
    Joined: Nov 6, 2006
    Posts: 433

    robt500
    Member
    from Lex, KY

    I love my copy of Cool Cars Square Roll Bars and the East Coast look featured within. cool '40
     
  11. 1935Ron
    Joined: Dec 31, 2006
    Posts: 1,372

    1935Ron
    Member


    all around great read!


    true CA. had alot of aircraft plants but not all my mother worked for Wrights during the war in Paterson NJ where the engines for the b-29 was made ,,an uncle that lived in LI NY worked for Republic, Gruman and what about Vought in Conn. or Pratt and Whitney,and the list goes on....
     
  12. flash
    Joined: Mar 12, 2001
    Posts: 556

    flash
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I wonder if the questionable craftsmanship of early East Coast hot rods and customs might be a myth? I suspect that because the scene was so much larger on the West Coast, only the very best cream-of-the-crop cars got featured in magazines (and now written about in books). Because the East Coast scene was smaller, magazines here had less high-quality cars to choose from and possibly featured cars that would not be published out west, lending to the theory that the Eastern cars were inferior. I'm sure there must have been pretty crude stuff running around on the West Coast too, but just didn't get as much attention.
     
  13. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 15,077

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

    That could very well be the case. I wasn't around back then, so I can't really state an opinion conclusively. All I can do is restate what I've read and been told.
     
  14. zombiesarebad
    Joined: Aug 29, 2009
    Posts: 206

    zombiesarebad
    Member
    from Maine

    that is probably the coolest '40 Ford i've ever seen. Then again i'm about as east coast as you can get...
     
  15. banditomerc
    Joined: Dec 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,634

    banditomerc
    Member

    When i was first exposed to customs (early 70's),without the influence of the east coast/west coast style argument,I remember mentioning to my older brother how some of the early customs looked...ODD,thats when i heard for the first time,"thats an east coast custom".You must admit,Ryans initial asertions are dead on.
     
  16. banditomerc
    Joined: Dec 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,634

    banditomerc
    Member

    I won't argue that,after looking at your coupes chop i knew you were east coast...:D Here we go!!!!:eek:
     
  17. Definitley a good looking custom. The only thing that drives me crazy about these types of builds is the lack of running boards. I have said it before and I will say it again I think it looks stupid when they are removed off of '30-'40 era cars and the fenders are just left hanging in space. I just don't get it.
     
  18. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 15,077

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

    Well, customs died in the 60's for a reason. Folks forgot the basic rules of the art. Rather than customizing a car to improve upon its factory lines, folks started making changes just for the sake of changes. Cars got too damn crazy... over the top... and, this lead to cars that quite frankly, do nothing for my aesthetic values. Both coasts contributed.

    Hot Rods are a different matter all together. In my opinion, there is no arguing that the west coast set the pace. Other parts of the country only had the magazines to be influenced by. They didn't have the local conversations, the personalities, the salt and sand, etc... to really learn from. Instead, they built cars seemingly by piecemeal.

    A great example is the little Chevrolet that Meagan rolls in:

    [​IMG]

    I don't know the history of the car at all. But it just looks like a hot rod from the south. Some guy reads all of the hot rod mags he can get his hands on, but can't get to a early Ford coupe or roadster. Instead, he just sort of takes the principles he has translated from the Cali-speak and puts it towards what he does have - a 53 Chevrolet.

    I love that... There is so much grit and personality there.
     
  19. couverkid
    Joined: Mar 30, 2007
    Posts: 1,109

    couverkid
    Member

    Well I thought I would give a little history of the car you all are talking about. About 8 years ago I was at Bill Ross's house in yakima,wa. for a picnic and I was 25 years old at the time so many of the older hot rodders didnt give me the time of day. I heard a guy talking to a friend of mine about a chopped and channeled 40 ford coupe in ritzville,wa. I decided one day to try and track it down. It is about 250 miles away but I started calling guys I know. I heard there was a guy in ritzville that raced at bonnneville so I got out my program found his name call him and he sayed Yes I have a couple 40 ford coupes I want to sell all the stuff for $5,000. We talked and I hung up called my dad and sayed listen to this. My dad sayed go buy them this weekend so I did. I built my black 40 coupe from the one car.Another car was this chopped and channeled coupe. I bolted the sheetmetal back on it and set it in the back corner of my shop for a couple years. The guy I get it from was going to part it out to build this other 40 coupe body because the chopped and channeled car had good quarter panels and the other body need them. I thought you are crazy to cut up a chopped and channeled 40 ford coupe(he already cut the floors out and the rear wheelwells). Anyways this is just a small story of that car. When I got it, it had full length fenders as well as running boards on it.The car also had full drip rails and the center bar of the back window was removed.The car at one time was painted competition orange and the interior garnish mouldings where laying on the ground in the grass outside the car.It amazes my how some hot rods change over the years and then go back to the way they where built originally.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2009
  20. S.F.
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,737

    S.F.
    Member


    Some cars I do believe had questionable craftsmanship done to them on the east coast, And I have seen a few of those survivors. but around the dayton, Columbus, and Cincinnatti area There were some very nice East Coast cars built in the 50's and early 60's. There wasnt the amount of quality builds as there was in California but there were some. My 31 roadster is a period East Coast build done in 1959, It was built really well for the time. It of course has the trademark HARD channel and no chop to the windshield. The work done on my car in 59 was just as good as stuff coming out today...BUT when the car was sold to the guy I bought it off of in 1961 he did some really hack job stuff to the car. I have had to cut out and replace everything he did, like when he put the current engine in it in 64, and hung a different rear end in it. I had to re hang the rear end in the car, and new motor mounts and a few other little things. Anyway, I guess it just depends on who built it. The guy that did the original build on my car went on to be a well known body man in the area that painted high end cars (Boyd Spencer) and he still paints cars today at 75. Steve Warling the owner in 59 also is a very good carpenter, who still builds things today too.
     
  21. zombiesarebad
    Joined: Aug 29, 2009
    Posts: 206

    zombiesarebad
    Member
    from Maine

    ouch :eek:! Hop on a plane and come show us how it's done, slick! :D

    maybe there really is something to this debate. Personally i don't like shaved drip rails or the real slanted-back profiles, they look to cartoonish to me. I like a more aggressive look. I don't enjoy "rolling slow" either.

    anyways it's an interesting debate, but maybe we should save it for some other thread?
     
  22. S.F.
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,737

    S.F.
    Member


    I Agree with most you say, but I do believe that East coast hot rodding was just as large as California, But it just wasnt published in as many magazines of the period. Ask the guys that grew up then cruising Woodward.....as well as the Dayton Old timers, I have come to find out that Dayton, Springfield and surrounding cities had HUGE hot rod scenes then. I wasnt there (I wish I would have been) but this is all from asking the old timers.
     
  23. chopo
    Joined: Feb 20, 2006
    Posts: 1,176

    chopo
    Member

    being an east coast guy with a heavy channel car...... My Dad grew up in Pa. He and his brothers were always "messin" with cars as gram would say. Dad tells me stories of just this topic. His favorite story is of a 40 ford he had bought for the mear sum of 17.00. Here is where it gets relevant. Cars from my area have issues with rot due to heavy salt in the winter time. So dad buys this ford brings it home. the floors are rotted out. they cut out the floors and...... a perfect time for a channel. My Dad liked old cars. Liked the height look of a chopped car but relised you could get thar same kinda look with just moving the floors up. Made it easier. Lets face it there has always been more money on the west coast. And "nice" un rusted cars were easier to come by. East coast ways I think were more out of neccesity. I hate to call us 1/2 assed or whatever maybe not so glam. But I see the points. Just my thoughts on that.
     
  24. dana barlow
    Joined: May 30, 2006
    Posts: 1,941

    dana barlow
    Member
    from Miami Fla.

    I'm old and from South East,even got into CarCraft back in Jan. 1963,Man there were a lot of very small magazines in Fla. of names ya naver here of at all any more,they'ed show up at a show and maybe only print one,or two to four a year and they were gone. I wish I'd kept some of them now.:eek:
    Wounder if the bigger mag.s west coast staying around,that you seem to base some of this on is why ya get and idea like that?? I when't too and was in many car shows between 1958 on to 1965 all around Fla, and Ga. ,cars were top work and nice. There were not so good cars that didn't make the shows for sure as was ture on the west coast too.
    Having been there myself and know better.
    More often then not,when I tell a young guy how it was,he gets pissed it wasn't what he thinks,so gets mad at me. I do put things as nice as canbe if asked,yet don't tell if not asked first,less it's very wrong and said to of been so called old school.
     
  25. autobodyed
    Joined: Mar 5, 2008
    Posts: 1,923

    autobodyed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from shelton ct

    i don't know, but maybe the term "to hell with how they do it in california" really started in the 40's and 50's and not in the 70's and 80's like i remember it.
     
  26. carl s
    Joined: Mar 22, 2008
    Posts: 687

    carl s
    Member
    from Indio, CA

    growing up in Boston in the 40s and 50s these examples look just right to me:)

    Thanks for the post
     
  27. safariknut
    Joined: Nov 25, 2001
    Posts: 5,086

    safariknut
    Member

    Just finished reading this post and went back to look at the HONK! article.If that is the Fred Cain I am thinking of,his son(Fred F.Cain)owned a Chrysler dealership in Wilmington and campaigned several race cars in the 60's;one of which was the,"HURRI-CAIN" funny car.I guess it is just in the blood.
     
  28. Revhead
    Joined: Mar 19, 2001
    Posts: 3,013

    Revhead
    Member
    from Dallas, TX

    this might not have any relevance, but look at what gets on tv these days. since most of the shows are produced in california, most of the cars seen are from califronia. Why would they spend the extra cash to fly across the states when they can get a feature car in a hours drive. maybe the same was true back then and an east coast car had to be REALLY special to warrant the cost.
     
  29. HomemadeHardtop57
    Joined: Nov 15, 2007
    Posts: 3,518

    HomemadeHardtop57
    Member

    great stuff...EAST COAST!!!!
     
  30. jjsound
    Joined: May 27, 2008
    Posts: 339

    jjsound
    Member

    I'd buy the rotten floor bit. Rusty Floors!!! Hot n stinky in summer and cold the other 9 months:eek:
     

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