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Dynamat Alternative?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 43gman, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. 43gman
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 187

    43gman
    Member
    from NC

    I'm getting ready to heat/sound insulate the old Plymouth. I came across this stuff and wondered if any of you have tried it? I tried the search, here, nothing for “Quietcoat." I wanted some first hand information, if available.

    Seems would be a lot easier to do a car, and maybe cheaper?

    http://www.quietrock.com/soundproof-products/quietcoat.html

    Thanks in advance for any feedback. GA
     
  2. 42 chevy
    Joined: Nov 1, 2006
    Posts: 623

    42 chevy
    Member

    I remember a thread about this somewhere. I think some guy's were using a similar thing from Lowes or Home Depot? I cannot remember the name of it but seems it worked well.
     
  3. GREASER815
    Joined: Dec 2, 2008
    Posts: 973

    GREASER815
    Member

    I got 2 big rolls of sound deadener, the tape, and a can of the spray adhesive from JC Whitney for $49. It actually was real nice to work with and works well. I live 2 miles from their outlet store though, not sure how much it would be with shipping for you guys.
     
  4. GREASER815
    Joined: Dec 2, 2008
    Posts: 973

    GREASER815
    Member

    Rockwool? Used under carpets in homes, I have heard of people using this, but if you go with an automotive deadener you get the foil side which is what blocks heat.
     
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  5. old lady's mad
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 162

    old lady's mad
    Member

    copied this post from another site. you can also get this in big rolls at comercial roofing supliers.

    Peel & Seal is the cheap alternative to Dynamat. This is the stuff you get from Lowes Hardware. It is the same as the original Dynamat but a lot cheaper.
    It's very, very close to Dynamat other than the price. It has a 40 mil rubberized aspalt sticky back, two layers of high stregth polymer film over a reflective aluminum surface.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. 42 chevy
    Joined: Nov 1, 2006
    Posts: 623

    42 chevy
    Member

    That is the stuff I was thinking of. Thanks
     
  7. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 9,228

    F&J
    Member
    from CT

    I used the stuff from Home Depot. It was a little hard to find in there, I think I ended up asking for gutter repair stuff. It comes in a roll, but only maybe 10" wide or so. But warm the metal on the car before putting it in place so it gets a perfect bond inside the doors etc. You don't want to have it fall off later.
     
  8. Big_John
    Joined: Mar 28, 2006
    Posts: 308

    Big_John
    Member
    from Upstate NY

    I just bought a roll from http://www.lobucrod.com/ , an alliance vendor here.

    Looks like nice stuff and the price was pretty good.
     
  9. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 2,503

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Mike (Lobocrud on H.A.M.B.) is an Alliance Vendor :
    http://www.lobucrod.com/
    I'm using his stuff on my roadster build, haven't finished, much less driven the rod yet, but he has all sorts of db tests on his web site. I very much like the fact that his stuff uses seperate adnesive ( a spray 3M trim glue) that takes a little time to set up, not one that's stuck tight as soon as it touches. This allows you to proerly place a piece. Check it out.
    Dave
     
  10. Johnny1290
    Joined: Apr 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,841

    Johnny1290
    Member

    lobucrod's stuff is great for insulation. I used DP landau top remover to glue it in place, shot it from a pot type gun.

    I'm not sure how much it reduces DBs though. Isn't it basically weight or bafffling that accomplishes that?

    Also I don't think you need to cover your car in dynamat to get the same results, just a piece on each panel

    see sounddeadenershowdown.com for the best info I've seen on the web

    For exterior noise reduction the best thing I did in my car was heavy jute with a foil back from jc whitney.
     
  11. ROADSTERJEFF
    Joined: Jan 28, 2008
    Posts: 400

    ROADSTERJEFF
    Member

    I have used FatMat
     
  12. lmte11
    Joined: Nov 10, 2006
    Posts: 49

    lmte11
    Member

    Do these materials (Dynamat, peel & seal, etc) hold in water and condensation like the original rubber/plastic floor mats on the older cars? I know that with my Buick and a Studebaker I used to have, the water being held by the mats caused the floor pans to rot out over time. I too am looking at putting something similar in my car and don't the rust to start up again.
     
  13. Hivolt5.0
    Joined: Apr 13, 2010
    Posts: 674

    Hivolt5.0
    Member

    I've used products from www.bquiet.com with good success. It too is a lot cheaper than Dynamat and is easy to install. I've installed it on my non-Hamb friendly '93 Mustang and my buddies Hamb friendly '50 Ford F1. I put two layers on the truck (floor to ceiling).
     
  14. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 2,503

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The way I figger it, most any mat is gonna hold water longer than a bare floor, but if the insulation is made of material that doesn't absorb water, then you've done the best you can do with any insulation. Not too confident myself in the spray on stuff like Lizard Skin, too many memories of spray on undercoating that , after it cracked, it let water in under it, then shielded the water from evaporation.
    Dave
     
  15. BinderRod
    Joined: Jul 9, 2006
    Posts: 1,740

    BinderRod
    Member

    The sealer from Lowes can be found in the roofing area. It roof flashing sealer. I have in my truck and boy did it make thing quieter and the doors now sound solid when you close them.
     
  16. BenderJ
    Joined: Sep 15, 2009
    Posts: 68

    BenderJ
    Member
    from Detroit

    I opted for Lizard Skin. It was fairly easy to apply to the trunk and floor pans. To prep, I cleaned the surfaces, took care of one small spot of surface rust (by gas pedal), used 3" blue painters tape to mask trim/etc., and then sprayed 2 coats of Sound Control, then 2 coats of Ceramic Insulator. It took about 30 minutes each application (trunk and floor), over a course of 4 days (1 day drying time). Make sure you have a good compressor, and regulate the air to ~65psi. I also purchased the Lizard Skin applicator sprayer, which made it very easy to apply. Overall, I used just over 1GAL each for this project.

    Unfortunately, I'm not sure on the difference it has made (before/after). Still working on getting car back together and on the road.

    I'm really not that worried about moisture getting into cracks or underneath spray - The total thickness (per instructions) is less than 2 millimeters. Also, things like wet shoes are not a problem (because of floor mats) and food/drinks are simply not allowed in vehicle.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Mattilac
    Joined: Oct 27, 2007
    Posts: 1,114

    Mattilac
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yep I've used a combination of the Peel & Seal type stuff along with Lobucrod's insulation and it worked pretty well.
     
  18. BinderRod
    Joined: Jul 9, 2006
    Posts: 1,740

    BinderRod
    Member

    Insulating Paint and
    Insulating Additives for Paint<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    Q: What is the difference between using a ceramic insulating additive and my paint vs pre-mixed Hy-Tech Insulating Paint?
    A:To better understand the answer to this question you need to understand the basics of paint formulations.

    Basic latex paint is nothing more than a pigment, water, a binder to hold it all together and additives which can be added to improve flow and leveling, eliminate bubbles, mildewcides etc.
    A paint formulators goals are to insure that
    1.) There is sufficient pigment to make the paint cover well
    2.) Sufficient binder to hold the pigment to the surface and give it durability and
    3.) Enough vehicle, (water in latex paints and solvent in oil base paints) to insure easy flowing and workability.

    The finished product is a balanced blend of the three basic ingredients quality depending on type of pigment used, amount of water and type of resin which is why there is quite a spread in paint prices.

    Adding Ceramics to ready made paint:
    Hy-Tech ceramics are at the top of the list of quality paint pigments, they are stronger, the hard ceramic shell resists staining, ceramics are flame resistant and the ball bearing shape improves flow and leveling. When you add our recommended 32 oz (by volume) per gallon to a can of ready mixed paint you are upsetting the balance of pigment vs water that the formulator originally based his "recipe" on. This makes the paint thicker which requires the addition of water in order to insure easy flow and leveling, and you are requiring the binder or resin to hold into place a greater volume of pigment. Sounds pretty bad but not really. First of all adding 1/2 to 1 pint of water to a gallon of paint is not going to make or break its properties. Most traditional paint pigments are soft and irregular in shape allowing for easy stain penetration, drag on the paint application tool and fast to erode. Ceramics being micro ball bearings improve flow and leveling, the hard ceramic shell resists dirt pickup and improves durability.
    Test Results: We took four different brands of medium priced interior wall paints and added 32 oz of Hy-Tech ceramic additive, reduced the paints with 1/2 - 1 pint of water to bring back the original viscosity and performed side by side scrub tests to compare the original paint with the ceramic reinforced paint. In each and every case the ceramic filled paint outperformed the original paint!!
    Advantages of Hy-Tech Insulating Additive:
    Economical: 1.) Being lightweight shipping fees are reduced.
    2.) No waste, use what you need now and store the remaining ceramic additive for future painting projects.
    Convenience: The ceramic additive can be stored indefinitely so it is always on hand for when you have the time to paint.
    Versatile: Hy-Tech ceramics can be mixed into Any brand or type of paint, coating, mastic, adhesive, or cement base mixture such as stucco mix, tile grout and thin set, plaster, any product that needs improved insulating, sound deadening or increased slip resistance properties.
    3.) The ceramics with the addition of
    Hy-Tech Acri-Flow allows you to use inexpensive, locally available paint and turn that paint into a premium, long lasting, insulating wall or ceiling paint coating. <o:p></o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>


    Advantages of Hy-Tech Pre-Mixed Paint:
    When we formulate a paint from scratch we are able to include a very high percentage of insulating ceramics to our blend with just enough other pigments to insure good covering and hiding power. Number 1 grade titanium is our pigment of choice due to its efficiency in scattering visible light, imparting whiteness, brightness, and high opacity. We minimize the water content and load our formulas with a very high concentration of resins each selected for the what is required of that paints application.
    1. Higher concentration of ceramics for increased insulation and durability.
    2. A higher percentage of long lasting resin than most other paints.
    3. Minimum amount of water.
    4. Economical, take the price of a gallon of premium quality paint, add the cost of an additive, the total is generally more than one of our pre-mixed Hy-Tech insulating paints which gives you more insulating ceramics per square foot of applied product.
    5. Convenience, no mixing, simply open the can and "Brush away your high utility bills"


    Whatever your choice, adding the insulating ceramics to your own paint or using one of the Hy-Tech pre-mixed insulating paints, the end result is you will be saving money on your heating and cooling bills, reducing sound and providing the painted surface with a durable long lasting ceramic finish.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
     
  19. BinderRod
    Joined: Jul 9, 2006
    Posts: 1,740

    BinderRod
    Member

  20. BinderRod
    Joined: Jul 9, 2006
    Posts: 1,740

    BinderRod
    Member

    <TABLE style="WIDTH: 100%; BACKGROUND: #990000; mso-cellspacing: 0in; mso-padding-alt: 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt" class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR style="mso-yfti-irow: 0; mso-yfti-firstrow: yes; mso-yfti-lastrow: yes"><TD style="BORDER-BOTTOM: #f0f0f0; BORDER-LEFT: #f0f0f0; PADDING-BOTTOM: 3pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent; PADDING-LEFT: 3pt; PADDING-RIGHT: 3pt; BORDER-TOP: #f0f0f0; BORDER-RIGHT: #f0f0f0; PADDING-TOP: 3pt">Sound Deadening Installation

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    <o:p</o>>


    <TABLE style="WIDTH: 100%; BACKGROUND: white; mso-cellspacing: 0in; mso-padding-alt: 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt 3.0pt" class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR style="mso-yfti-irow: 0; mso-yfti-firstrow: yes; mso-yfti-lastrow: yes"><TD style="BORDER-BOTTOM: #f0f0f0; BORDER-LEFT: #f0f0f0; PADDING-BOTTOM: 3pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent; PADDING-LEFT: 3pt; PADDING-RIGHT: 3pt; BORDER-TOP: #f0f0f0; BORDER-RIGHT: #f0f0f0; PADDING-TOP: 3pt" vAlign=top>

    One of my main concerns during the rod-storation of my truck was I wanted the ride in it to be comfortable and quiet. This would require me to do more than simply install factory type insulation/sound deadening. I have heard and read some good things about a product called Brown Bread (BB) and decided to give it a try. I ended up purchasing the Brown Bread from B-QUIET, but you can also find it on E-bay for a little cheaper. The following steps will show you how I installed this stuff in my truck, and will give you a good idea on what it takes to install it in yours if you choose to do so.<o:p</o>>
    Here is a list of the following items you will need to do this… <o:p</o>>
    Product
    - 70 Sq. Ft. of Brown Bread sound deadening, more if you are working on a Blazer or Suburban.<o:p</o>>
    Tools
    - Utility knife (with extra blades)
    - Exacto/hobby knife (with extra blades)
    - 1” wooden (or similar) roller
    - Heat gun or hair drier
    - Tape measure
    - Medium tip Sharpie/permanent marker
    - Straight edge or similar tool (T-square works great)<o:p</o>>
    Optional (for creating templates)
    - Scissors
    - Ruler
    - Pencil
    - Copy paper or scratch paper
    - Tape<o:p</o>>
    The first thing you want to do is to make sure your cab is completely gutted. This means removing the seat(s), carpet, insulation, lower trim panels, seat belts, rear speakers if you have them, etc…basically everything from the dashboard down has to be removed to do a complete and quality job. Once everything is removed you should be staring at a bare metal floor with nothing in the way. With everything out of the way, you will now need to clean the surfaces you will be applying the sound deadening to so they are free of contaminants…contaminants such as oil and dirt for example. <o:p</o>>
    Now you are ready to start the installation. There are many curves, valleys, and bumps on the inside of 73-87 cabs…making the installation tricky and frustrating at times. Because of this, I would (and did) tackle the hardest areas first. The areas that were the hardest for me were the hump the seat sits on and the inside firewall. With the hard areas out of the way, the rest is pretty simple. Installing the BB is pretty straightforward and self explanatory. All you really do is cut it to shape, roll it flat with a roller, and apply heat while doing so. <o:p</o>>
    Here are a few pointers for actually installing the BB… <o:p</o>>
    1. When rolling out the BB, try to start in the center of the piece you are applying and work your way outward towards the edges. This is especially true if the area you are covering has many curves, ridges, or valleys. <o:p</o>>
    2. Roll out the high spots first so you won’t be “shorting” yourself when you do the sides of those high spots. If you do the high spots last, you may not have enough material to seat the BB properly and it will end up tearing when you roll it out. <o:p</o>>
    3. Be careful when laying down the piece you are about to apply. Because the BB has a sticky tar like backing, if it touches anything it will leave a black mark on it that will have to be cleaned up…especially if it is a visible area. <o:p</o>>
    4. Like I mentioned in step #3, BB is sticky. Once you have rolled out the piece you are applying, it will be very difficult to remove it if you make a mistake, and attempting to will destroy that piece. Take your time and measure carefully. <o:p</o>>
    5. Applying heat while rolling out the material makes the job very easy. I did find out that if the temperature is around 50F or above, the BB can be rolled out without the use of heat. If it is below 50F, I found heat was necessary in order to achieve proper adhesion. <o:p</o>>
    6. I chose to cut and install the pieces of BB like a puzzle. My main goal was to overlap as little as possible for a very clean installation and to not waste as much material since I was unsure if I would have enough BB for the entire cab. To do this, I made templates out of paper for the hard/curvy areas and then cut the BB based on the template. This gave me the clean look I was after and wasted very little material. <o:p</o>>
    7. Save a few larger pieces of the backing paper. This will give you a surface to cut out smaller pieces of “scrap” BB if the need arises. <o:p</o>>
    8. If you use your girlfriends, fiancés, or wife’s hair drier for this project…make sure she doesn’t find out or you could find yourself in the dog house. <o:p</o>>
    Once you have all the sound deadening installed, it is now time to cut out your seat belt, seat, and any other miscellaneous mounting holes you may have so you can re-install those pieces when the time comes. For this a small exacto or hobby knife works excellent, but beware, the blade will “gum up” fairly quickly and will need to be cleaned or replaced to achieve clean and sharp cuts.<o:p</o>>
    Below you will see some photos of the Brown Bread installed in my truck. I have yet to finish the transmission tunnel and below the rear window, but once I get my shifter location determined and the run in the paint wet-sanded (below the window), <o:p</o>>
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>​
     
  21. SKRTCHSR
    Joined: Feb 1, 2007
    Posts: 482

    SKRTCHSR
    Member
    from Cincinnati

  22. Johnny1290
    Joined: Apr 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,841

    Johnny1290
    Member

    4 coats of lizardskin won't get you the reccomended depth. The thickness of a credit card takes more like 6 to 8. The interesting thing is the lack of repeatable method to test its effectiveness in your car.

    Its like percieved horsepoower. If you put something on that makes your car louder or simply is #supposed# to make hp, most think they can tell a difference.

    Prove to me it works in your car. Or give me a useable test.

    It definitely will reduce the high frequency? Resonance? Sounds/tinnyness, like peel n stick will.

    I'm skeptical but open to being wrong.
     
  23. Budro35
    Joined: Dec 22, 2007
    Posts: 112

    Budro35
    Member

    I have used the insulation from Mike @ www.lobucrod.com with great results. My fear with all the other products is the asphalt based material that could cause "FIRE" :eek: I am not game for that!! Get in touch with Mike and remember he is a HAMB vendor :cool:
     
  24. Fordor Ron
    Joined: May 19, 2008
    Posts: 1,136

    Fordor Ron
    Member

    I bought some stuff off Ebay that's exactly like Dynamat but with no logo. It was like $200 shipped and was more than enough to do my 32 Sedan.
     
  25. 29NashRod
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 66

    29NashRod
    Member
    from Portland

    All I know is that you have to be careful with the original Dynamat and a lot of the no-name products because they use an asphalt-based insulator that is both really heavy and also becomes hard and brittle over time and in cold temperatures. A lot of people have problems with it falling off inside doors and headliners. I'm considering Eastwood's thermo-coustic sound deadener, which isn't the old asphalt based stuff, but it still cheaper than dynamat. Anybody have any experience with this stuff?
     
  26. McCoy
    Joined: May 16, 2009
    Posts: 16

    McCoy
    Member
    from Seatown

    Dynamat is crap. Holds in moisture and the results are terrible. One coating of "Chassis Saver" - 2 layers of "LizardSkin - and a final coating of "Monster Liner" will Reduce noise by 10-12 decibels or more (depending on how many layers you spray, Reduce engine and solar heat transfer by 25-30 degrees or more and Protect surfaces from moisture and corrosion. The weight factor? A lot less than soggy DynaMat. Proof that it works? Sprayed the back of a plastic interior panel thinking I would hear a sharp knock. Ws more like a soft thud. Sprayed the LizardSkin on a hot day and the coated surface was cool to the touch instead of egg fryin' hot.

    [​IMG]
     
  27. Black Primer
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 968

    Black Primer
    Member

    X2 the price is right and it works very well.
     
  28. Johnny1290
    Joined: Apr 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,841

    Johnny1290
    Member

    I've got a DB meter and I've done testing with it and sound proofing my generatror. There is zero chance your monster liner reduced noise by 12 db unless you rubbed the can and a genie popped out and granted you one wish.

    I could stick a Big Mac on my door and it would reduce the sound from a sharp knock to a thud.

    You know that the surface temperature of your roof doesn't mean that your car is any cooler, right? Insulation only slows down the transfer of heat, not prevent it.

    Do you have air conditioning? If not, how does that coating help you?

    If you have an ice chest, don't you need ice in it to keep things cool?

    What happens if you put something hot in a thermos? It stays hot, right? If you don't have a/c in the summer, and you add your body in the car and drive for a bit, well now your car has heated up to the temperature it would have been without the insulation, except that insulation has served to keep heat *inside* so now it's hotter than ever.

    My house is insulated. If I don't turn on the A/C in the summertime, it's still damn hot. The more insulation I have, the less time I need to run the A/C to keep it cool, but I still need that A/C or I'll roast.

    There's just a ton of misinformation about sound deadener/insulation/etc and also buckets full of hoakum.

    They sell a lot of bluesky, but with car stuff that's where you make money.
     
  29. BenderJ
    Joined: Sep 15, 2009
    Posts: 68

    BenderJ
    Member
    from Detroit

    Nasty! It almost looks like once Dynamat (or like) is applied, forget about removing it...
     
  30. Frankie47
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 1,272

    Frankie47
    Member
    from omaha ne.

    That looks like it was crusty before the mat was applied.:confused:
     

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