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Beverly Hillbillet part 2

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Jethro, Jul 8, 2005.

  1. Jethro
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 982

    Jethro
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ok with the piece cut out I screw the pattern to my bench and spray contact cement on both pieces
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Next I insert a flush trimming laminate bit in the router and trim the piece flush with the pattern
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Then I change the bit to a roundover bit and give the edge a nice treatment.
    [​IMG]
    Last I seperate the piece from the pattern and clean the glue off the back.
    [​IMG]
    All it needs is a little sanding to take some of the burrs off then it's done.If you want it to look sand cast just blast it with glass beads or even coarse sand.
     
  2. Mule Farmer
    Joined: Jun 1, 2005
    Posts: 1,406

    Mule Farmer
    Member
    from Holland MI

    Nice very nice.


    Bret
     
  3. middleskewl
    Joined: Jun 16, 2004
    Posts: 165

    middleskewl
    Member

    Now that's slick.
    Are those wood bits in the router??
     
  4. Jethro
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 982

    Jethro
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yeah just plain ol carbide tipped bits...Use decent quality ones though , some of the cheap asian ones don't last.
     
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  5. Mutt
    Joined: Feb 6, 2003
    Posts: 3,222

    Mutt
    Member

    Very impressive! Thank you....


    Mutt
     
  6. Jethro
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 982

    Jethro
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    trying to keep both halfs together
     
  7. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 4,555

    Tim
    Member
    from Raytown Mo

    you could have just posted the second part pictures in a replie to your first thread .....but if you want to keep these two together since you already got both of them started you could copy the address of this one and paste it into a replie on the first one, then yo could just click the link to find the second part


    looks cool

    tim
     
  8. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member


    looks like a freud patern bit in a nice makita plunge router?
    and i love your finger joint jig...never thought of using it to make machined cross hatch cuts in aluminum tho,, good thinking :cool:
    NICE tech for sure

    one word of caution tho for those of us who work a lil wood that have never used WWing machines to work aluminum. use GOOD carbide tipped cutters and blades, dont skimp and use the el-cheapo ones as has been mentioned, and DONT USE your dust collector if you have a central DC unit in your shop like i do... the stuff dont make any more static electricity than does wood, less actualy, but it does play hell with your dust collector bags...

    dont ask how i know this :p i just do.

    also expect to be pelted with little bits of hotter than hell aluminum and wear your safety glasses...better yet a face shield!

    BTTT for some good fun tech


    ******
    link to the first in this tech posting :D
     
  9. Chopped50Ford
    Joined: Feb 16, 2003
    Posts: 5,858

    Chopped50Ford
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    1. Vintage Van-atics

    a very cool, but simple tech...

    are those wood bits your using in the router?
     
  10. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member

    i can say for sure they are, as i have worked aluminum with woodworking tools plenty of times. standard woodworking carbide tipped bits and blades, just not the cheap ones. the bargain bits tend to fall apart working wood and you dont want that.
    i have had a carbide come flying off a cheap menards (big box store kinda like home depot or lowes here in the midwest) blade and its spooky. little zinging pops as the tips go flying past you at over the speed of sound :eek: :mad:
     
  11. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 29,873

    Tman
    Member

    Best tech post all week!
     
  12. loogy
    Joined: Mar 6, 2004
    Posts: 1,231

    loogy
    Member

    Thats pretty cool man. What brand blades and bits do you reccomend? I don't know squat about wood working obviously.


    Chris
     
  13. deuceguy
    Joined: Nov 10, 2002
    Posts: 432

    deuceguy
    Member

    Pretty fucking cool!
     
  14. Jethro
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 982

    Jethro
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    I use Freud router bits...they cost a bit more than the offshore ones but they stay sharp longer and don't fly apart like the cheap ones. Any good tool house or woodworking supply should carry them.
     
  15. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member

    yea, freud makes a killer bit, and less expensive than CMT. i use CMT for cabinet and furniture stuff, and freud for utility.

    the table saw blades i use are from a place called Ridge Carbide... spendy as hell but worth every penny. hilti thin kerf table saw blades for utility shit
     
  16. KING CHASSIS
    Joined: Aug 28, 2005
    Posts: 1,864

    KING CHASSIS
    Member

    Nice , I wanted to do this to my clutch pedal. But couldnt figure out how to get the "waffel" pattern. Thanks
     
  17. Yo Baby
    Joined: Jul 11, 2004
    Posts: 2,817

    Yo Baby
    Member

    Well hell yeah! That's usin' the ol'noggin'!
     
  18. Royalshifter
    Joined: May 29, 2005
    Posts: 15,245

    Royalshifter
    Moderator
    from California

    One small step for HAMB!................One large step for HAMB kind!
     
  19. Flatdog
    Joined: Jan 31, 2003
    Posts: 1,287

    Flatdog
    Member Emeritus

    Routers also work to relieve flatheads.
     
  20. elcornus
    Joined: Apr 8, 2005
    Posts: 652

    elcornus
    Member

    Router with carbide bit= hand held milling machine :)
     
  21. Most of my hearing loss came from cutting aluminum sign extrusion in the old days. Wear ear protection and save your hearing and help prevent the ringing that is going on in my head right now. Please.
     
  22. burbanite
    Joined: May 31, 2006
    Posts: 160

    burbanite
    Member

    Very cool. I see you made a brake pedal as well.
     
  23. Jeem
    Joined: Sep 12, 2002
    Posts: 5,877

    Jeem
    Alliance Vendor

    Like you said, you could blast the piece to give it a cast look. Maybe hit it HARD with coarse stuff. I'd imagine one could use a bevel profiled bit (maybe a 60° straight edge?) in a router flipped over in a table to REALLY give a cast look to the waffle pattern?
     
  24. Jim in STL
    Joined: Mar 3, 2006
    Posts: 13

    Jim in STL
    Member

    Just a small suggestion....

    Use a couple of strips of automotive trim tape to hold the wood/aluminum pieces together for routing. Works as well as contact cement and cleans up much easier.
     
  25. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member

    carpet tape... shit holds like iron but comes off easy without residue... use it all the time for pattern work on the router table
     
  26. Neophyte
    Joined: Mar 27, 2006
    Posts: 335

    Neophyte
    Member

    How many passes did you make with the router to do the trimming of the piece and the rounding of the edge?
     
  27. Jethro
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 982

    Jethro
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    I made one pass to trim and one to roundover. Just make sure you go slow.
     
  28. sawzall
    Joined: Jul 15, 2002
    Posts: 4,414

    sawzall
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This is a great post..

    but..

    HOTROD 1940 is Right on the money..

    I once (during my misguided youth) used a CNC wood router to create a billet steering wheel..

    IT WAS very very loud..

    please dont try this at home without good eye and hearing protection..

    for those without a tablesaw you could also use a 60 degree router bit mounted in a router table..

    however, you would need to make several adjustments to the router table fence during the process.
    (to cut the "waffles" this would create more of a "diamond pattern"
    [​IMG]
     
  29. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member

    also make damn sure you have a zero clearance insert in the router table... routers kinda frown on gettin filled up with metal shavings
     
  30. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member

    no need to adjust. . . simply two side tape "shim" faces over the fence. 1/4", 1/2", 1", 2", 3" etc... total of 5 shims needed to space it out 3 3/4". . . this way, you dont adjust the fence, making for a pain in the ass keeping the thing aligned for the cuts. the fence stays put, keeping all the cuts parallel :cool:
     

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