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Bending 1/8 or 11ga steel

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Hellfish, Aug 30, 2011.

  1. Hellfish
    Joined: Jun 19, 2002
    Posts: 6,175

    Hellfish
    Member

    I need to bend some into a 3.5 x 4" hat channel. I don't have a brake. Can this be done in a hammer form, or a homemade brake, or is it too thick?
     
  2. Jim Stabe
    Joined: Oct 31, 2008
    Posts: 180

    Jim Stabe
    Member

    If you have a press you could make something like this

    Bending angles.jpg
     
  3. The Internet
    Joined: Dec 20, 2010
    Posts: 109

    The Internet
    Member
    from Hudson, NH

    Hat channel would be difficult to form with a press.

    I have done 1/8" with a hammer and torch. Depending on the aplication, you may not want to change the metal with the heat.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  4. Jmountainjr
    Joined: Dec 29, 2006
    Posts: 615

    Jmountainjr
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Maine

    How long is the section you need to bend? If fairly short, I bend small 11ga items all the time with a 24" adjustable wrench in the vice.
     
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  5. R Frederick
    Joined: Mar 30, 2009
    Posts: 2,662

    R Frederick
    Member
    from illinois

    If it's very long, I've scored it with a thin cutoff wheel and stitch welded after it was bent. As I did for my floor pans that I accidently ordered 16ga. instead of 18.:eek:
     
  6. silent rick
    Joined: Nov 7, 2002
    Posts: 2,779

    silent rick
    Member

    doesn't kevin have anything at the shop that will handle that?
     
  7. Hellfish
    Joined: Jun 19, 2002
    Posts: 6,175

    Hellfish
    Member

    I need to bend up 2 sections that are about 14" long, 4" tall, and 3.5 wide. I'm replacing a section of unibody frame. It was a little thinner from the factory, but I have a sheet of 1/8 (maybe 11 or 12ga?) already. A little thicker is better in this case since the springs attach to it. I could just get some box tubing, but like I said, I already have a sheet in the gauge I need... :)
     
  8. scottb356
    Joined: Jun 10, 2011
    Posts: 153

    scottb356
    Member

    bench vise, mapp gas, adjustable wrench, bfh. Done
     
  9. Roger Walling
    Joined: Sep 26, 2010
    Posts: 1,118

    Roger Walling
    Member

    1/8" is thick enough to mig. very easly. Cut strips and weld and grind.
    or use 4" square tubing and weld a flat stock onto it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  10. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 17,766

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    A friend who works in a local welding fabricating shop with a big brake always comes in handy at times like this.

    Otherwise I'd take JIm Stabe's idea and run with it.
     
  11. 50dodge4x4
    Joined: Aug 7, 2004
    Posts: 3,221

    50dodge4x4
    Member

    Clamp it to a steel bench, heat it up and bend it with a hammer. if you heat the flat stock, you don't have to hit it very hard to bend it to a 90 degree bend. Won't look pretty but will do the job. If you have some heavy angle a a good vice, you can clamp the flat stock between two pieces of angle in the vice, heat and bend, finish with tapping the bend flat against the angle. Makes a prettier bend but takes a little longer. Don't forget to bend the flanges to weld to the floor pan as well. Gene
     
  12. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,471

    budd
    Member

    what is the thickness of metal your replacing? if you go thicker then its a good chance it will crack along the joint, the thinner metal will have more flex then the thicker, also if i follow you a brake would require a goose neck punch, not something everyone has.
     

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  13. 73RR
    Joined: Jan 29, 2007
    Posts: 5,062

    73RR
    Member

  14. jimvette59
    Joined: Apr 28, 2008
    Posts: 551

    jimvette59
    Member

    Use box tubing, cut it and weld it back to the shape you need. I know you have the plate but it may be better to use box tubing or cut the plate in strips and weld it together. Just my way of thinking ???
     
  15. realkustom51
    Joined: Nov 14, 2005
    Posts: 643

    realkustom51
    Member

    You can also make a "Window Punch". A punch that can disassemble to get the part out. In fact you can form up square tubing in a window punch.
    Keep in mind that you may have to over bend about 4 to 12 degrees so that you part relaxes to 90 degrees.(springback).
    Bear with me, I had to draw these driving down the road when I read the thread.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 5,105

    117harv
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You are replacing a factory piece, if you bend it in a brake or press the bends will be rounded and not sharp like the origonal being thicker steel. I would do like another poster suggested and score it with a cut-off wheel, bend and weld. The inner weld will be hidden and the outer is easily ground and detailed. Doing it this way will keep the bends crisp. Clamp a piece of tubing inside as you weld to help keep it's shape.
     
  17. R Frederick
    Joined: Mar 30, 2009
    Posts: 2,662

    R Frederick
    Member
    from illinois

    Thank You. You can re-score it as you go if it doesn't bend far enough to widen the gap again. Because the gap will pinch as you fold it together. It leaves a nice crisp edge on the outside. I've even folded on a curved score.
     
  18. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 5,105

    117harv
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yes you can do it that way, but i usually score it and open it up not pinch it, and then weld back in what you ground out.
     
  19. R Frederick
    Joined: Mar 30, 2009
    Posts: 2,662

    R Frederick
    Member
    from illinois

    I'll do it that way too, (when I screw up and score the wrong side from the pattern) lol. :D
     
  20. realkustom51
    Joined: Nov 14, 2005
    Posts: 643

    realkustom51
    Member

    A real sharp radius will dictate how the part is formed. A press brake or leaf brake is out of the question if the radius needs to measure smaller than the material thickness. A typical industry standard is V x .155 = IR , (Vee Die Size times .155 equals the Inside Radius.
    example.
    11GA (.120) times 8 gives me the VEE DIE Opening (V=8t) which is .960 so rounded that of to 1" VEE DIE Opening.
    Now take 1.000 and multiply it by .155 (5/32) and then you get the ball park inside radius needed to form the part. By the way, that equals .155 and the official chart says .156 (ballpark).

    Just for kicks. I install and repair Accurpress Press Brakes and here is a back yard size 30" model. Uses standard american style tooling and is considered a 11GA press. (10 Ton Capacity=4 tons per ft). Just thought Id show it off since the subject was 11GA.(.120)

    [​IMG]

    Also here is a Bend Allowance Chart you can print out. Helps you cut the unbent blank the right size so it bends correctly.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  21. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 5,105

    117harv
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ^^^^wth? Man you are way over my head, we just want to bend metal...lol
     
  22. realkustom51
    Joined: Nov 14, 2005
    Posts: 643

    realkustom51
    Member

    In case you do brake it, the sequence I found that works is like this. Plus I had a undeveloped blank length of 12.010 which made a 3.5" tall OD x 4" hat center OD with 1" OD outer legs.

    STEP 1
    [​IMG]

    STEP 2
    [​IMG]

    STEP 3
    [​IMG]

    STEP 4
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  23. realkustom51
    Joined: Nov 14, 2005
    Posts: 643

    realkustom51
    Member

    Man I just had an opportunity to talk out my ass so I did.
     
  24. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,471

    budd
    Member

    is that really what the part looks like or is it 4" tall and 3.5" wide? that little accupress brake is pretty sweet, i have spent many hours running and working on 60 ton 8" accupress brakes, i have a 4ft 15 ton mecanical dreis and krump, , i has designed plans to build a hydraulic brake modeled on my dreis and krump hydraulic version, i installed an old satellite dish positioner to power my backgage now i can preset 8 different backgage settings..


     
  25. Jogyver
    Joined: Nov 20, 2009
    Posts: 56

    Jogyver
    Member

    Score your 11ga approx. 50% of the thickness . Use a brake and make your bends. The score lines should be opposite of your bend. Then weld the score lines and a few stich welded on the opposite side .
    Finished product
    [​IMG]
     
  26. Gregg Pellicer
    Joined: Aug 20, 2004
    Posts: 929

    Gregg Pellicer
    Member

    Not trying to hijack this thread. But if you havent looked go back to post #2.Click on the link to jim's MG build. Way O.T. but still an awsome build.
     
  27. 11ga hat channel, a.k.a. an old no parking sign post...

    [​IMG]
     
  28. Hellfish
    Joined: Jun 19, 2002
    Posts: 6,175

    Hellfish
    Member

  29. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 1,432

    bct
    Member

    i got the guys at a machine shop to do a whole 11g sheet in 4' x4" x1.25" hat ...it worked out to $3/FOOT....i think i got 15 pce. total....i asked for a few with a wider flange on one edge so i could trim to curves....
     
  30. Chaz
    Joined: Feb 24, 2004
    Posts: 3,975

    Chaz
    Member

    A good sheet metal shop is really the way to go here. They"re cheaper than you'd think . You"d prolly sped a whole day coming up with a poor imitation. Good luck with it. Keep us posted.
     

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