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History Auto racing 1894-1944

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    ehdubya ;The Tacoma public library has a nice collection of well researched Lakewood pics

    ehdubya..... I posted most all of their good racing photos already. I think the DePalma Ballot photo I posted a few days ago came from there which may not be correct and they may have a few other photos they have sourced from elsewhere and have captioned incorrectly.
     
  2. model.A.keith
    Joined: Mar 19, 2007
    Posts: 6,202

    model.A.keith
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  3. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

    Two photos from the Wisconsin State Fair track circa 1910. The first what appears to be a Buick team car making a pit stop. The second is an unknown car that looks very similar to a Mercer but has enough differences that I am fairly certain it is not one.
     

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  4. model.A.keith
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    model.A.keith
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  5. model.A.keith
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    model.A.keith
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    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 width=1024 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top width="15%" rowSpan=8>




    </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle width="65%" colSpan=3>The Donington Grand Prix - 1937 </TD></TR><TR><TD align=left colSpan=3>




    </TD></TR><TR><TD align=left colSpan=3>












    </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left width="100%">[​IMG]The Donington Grand Prix of 1937 was the race and the year in which the already legendary German Grand Prix cars made their first appearance in Great Britain. Although I had been watching these cars and reporting their races since they first emerged from their factories in 1934, the race on that October day remains in my memory, not so much on account of the racing, which developed on the usual lines, but because of little incidents and one moment which was profoundly impressive.


    There were the remarks of a group of journalists who were attending the race to observe the German Grand Prix achines for the first time. We were standing in the autumn sunshine during the first practice session on the sloping grass overlooking the so-called Hairpin Bend, which was a sharp, right-angled turn to the right on an uphill gradient at the foot of a fast, curving downhill approach with the woods on one side and the famous blasted oaks of Donington in the parkland on the other. Behind us the celebrated mansion of Donington, once the residence of a dissolute nobleman of the 18th century, a prisoner of war camp in World War One, and at the time in question a kind of hotel and restaurant for visitors to what had become a Derbyshire pleasure park open to the public.​

    The enterprise of the Derby and District Motor Club, led by the energy of brusque Fred Craner, who used adjectives when referring to a spade and was no respecter of persons, especially those we now call "VIPs" turned the roads of the estate into a racing circuit for motorcyclists. The immediate success of the venture led to motor racing, then to the steady extension of the circuit and the organization of important, international events.​

    [​IMG]That day the circuit measured 3 1/8 miles. It was shaped rather like a distorted frying pan, of which the "handle" was the latest extension of the course. The start and pits were on a very short straight at the top of a sharp uphill known as Melbourne Rise. Then came a right angle to the left (Red Gate), a long curving run downhill through Holly Wood and down, through a fast left-hander to the Hairpin, where we were grouped, waiting. Beyond us, the course wound away gently uphill and out of sight among the trees, through the yellow arch of the famous Stone Bridge (with room for one car at a time) to the near 90-degree turn of McLean's Corner in the woods and so to Coppice Corner, which was a right-hander sharper than a right angle. From here the road passed through scattered farm buildings and out on to the fastest section of all - the long mille and a half, with gentle, full-throttle curves, into the final dead straight line of Starkey's Straight which ended with the quite steep dip down, past the back of the pits, to the U-turn of Melbourne Hairpin. The course then returned uphill to the pits and grandstand enclosure at the top.​

    The practicing had just begun. Away beyond the woods we heard the approaching scream of a well-tuned E.R.A. and down the winding slope towards us came Raymond Mays. He changed down, braked, skirted round the Hairpin and was gone.​

    "There's the winner," remarked one of my friends. "Knows this course backwards."
    Half a minute later came the deeper note of a 2.9-litre Maserati, and "B. Bira" (Prince Birabongse of Siam, Mays’ nearest rival and a new star in the racing firmament) shot past us, cornering with that precision which marked him as the master he was.
    "Or him," said another.​

    We waited again. Then they came.​



    [​IMG]



    Far away in the distance we heard an angry, deep-throated roaring - as someone once remarked, like hungry lions impatient for the arena. A few moments later, Manfred von Brauchitsch, red helmeted, brought a great, silver projectile snaking down the hill, and close behind, his teammate Rudolf Caracciola, then at the height of his great career. The two cars took the hairpin, von Brauchitsch almost sideways, and rocketed away out of sight with long plumes of rubber smoke trailing from their huge rear tyres, in a deafening crash of sound.​


    The startled Pressmen gazed at each other, awe-struck.
    "Strewth," gasped one of them, "so that's what they're like!"
    That was what they were like.​



    RW​









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  6. gnichols
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 7,389

    gnichols
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    from Tampa, FL

    Keith, we all know it's a multi-chime whistle down there on the frame, but it sure looks like a James Bond, 001? style gatling gun! Gary
     
  7. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

    Ralph Mulford and his mechanic in their 597 CI six cylinder Knox, that they finished tenth in at the 1912 Indy 500.
     

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  8. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
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    T-Head
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    Strang in his winning Isotta at the 1908 Lowell Mass. Road Race.
     

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  9. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

    ...
     

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  10. jimdillon
    Joined: Dec 6, 2005
    Posts: 1,308

    jimdillon
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    Although my brain may not be in high gear this morning does this car have any parts that resemble the Adams we spoke of earlier, such as wheels and radiator?-Jim
     
  11. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,951

    kurtis
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    from Australia

    Fantastic photo.
     
  12. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
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    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

    Kurtis..... Welcome back.
     
  13. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,951

    kurtis
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    from Australia

    Thankyou my friend. I see there has been some great discussions.

    This is a wonderful group. Thanks to everyone.
     
  14. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,951

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    Hi Chuck.

    Could you do me a favor and ask Carlos and Leo if they have come across a Montier head for a Model T engine. It's a long shot but there was one found in that part of the world a few years ago.
     
  15. Jim Scammell
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 31

    Jim Scammell
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  16. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 17,715

    The37Kid
    Member

    Keith, thanks for the Stanley photo. I wonder how many of those 30HP Vanderbilt clones have beem built in the past 15 years?
     
  17. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,951

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    T-Head,

    I went to the library today to find the info you requested. Unfortunately the original photographer is not listed, instead the photo is attributed to the Neil Bruce/Peter Roberts Collection. My apologies.

    However i came across a thread on the Autosport forum some time ago discussing the Dieppe Circuit with some then and now photos to compare. It's amazing how some things haven't changed over time. Be sure to check it out.

    http://forums.autosport.com/index.php?showtopic=22656
     
  18. model.A.keith
    Joined: Mar 19, 2007
    Posts: 6,202

    model.A.keith
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    Sadly i have only seen pictures, found that one looking for something else.



    .

    .
    Keith
     
  19. twin6
    Joined: Feb 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,142

    twin6
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    from Vermont

  20. model.A.keith
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    model.A.keith
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    twin6,

    thanks for the link, found this on the Uk site


    'Whistling Billy'


    [​IMG]

    .

    .
     
  21. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,296

    ehdubya
    Member


    any story for this one Keith?
     
  22. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,296

    ehdubya
    Member

    whistling vs gobbling
     

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  23. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

     
  24. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    ...
     

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  25. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

    ...
     

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  26. model.A.keith
    Joined: Mar 19, 2007
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    model.A.keith
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    Picture was captioned as.


    On the right, an A-7 "Meteor?" On the left, Triumph Imp. Location, Lake Perkolilli, Western Australia, early 1930s.



    Keith

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    .
     
  27. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,296

    ehdubya
    Member

    thanks Keith, I thought it looked colonial but would never have guessed WA.

    1905 Vanderbilt Walter White...
     

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  28. twin6
    Joined: Feb 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,142

    twin6
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    from Vermont

    Does anyone have the scoop on what was under the bonnet on the White? The White passenger cars had a 2 cylinder (compound) engine, and flash tube boiler; about a quart of water was in the system when under power. They had condensers way before Stanley did. Very different setup from the Stanleys, which used fire tube boilers that held (in the case of the 30hp cars and racers) dozens of gallons of water. I'd love to know what made Whisting Billy go.
     
  29. model.A.keith
    Joined: Mar 19, 2007
    Posts: 6,202

    model.A.keith
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    The fastest dirt oval racing car in America in the summer of 1905 would have to be 'Whistling Billy' - the White steam racer driven by Webb Jay. For some reason the first two White racers were given the names Snail and Turtle.

    May 27 in Chicago he beat the great Barney Oldfield's Green Dragon, Louis Chevrolet in a Fiat, and Walter Christie's racer. Christie went so far as to put engines in the front and back of his racer, but even with 4 wheel drive the pesky steam car won again at Morris Park's July 4 races.

    The gasoline cars fortunes turned when Jay crashed his racer into a creek Aug. 18, at a race in Buffalo, NY. Jay was lucky to survive, and never raced again. These White steam racers are not well known, unlike the Stanley's. The best and almost the only research I've seen on the White racers was done by Dr. Keith Hardman, published as a short article in the Antique Automobile, Jan/Feb 1973.


    [​IMG]



    Taken from the Autosport bulletin board

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  30. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,985

    T-Head
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    from Paradise.

    A very youthful looking Ralph Mulford and his mechanic in a Lozier.
     

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