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Aluminum Intake Repair???

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by mrkling, May 18, 2010.

  1. mrkling
    Joined: Oct 30, 2009
    Posts: 142

    mrkling
    Member

    I'm wondering if the pitting on the mating surface can be repaired. It makes me nervous to install as is. This is the water jacket area. Any input is appreciated .[​IMG]
     
  2. hueyguns
    Joined: Oct 4, 2009
    Posts: 22

    hueyguns
    Member
    from pa

    How much meat is left behind her? Poke at it with a pick. If it goes through, find a replacement. If it does not got through, run it. You have a 100% sealing area, it is small, but 100%
     
  3. Joe Johnston
    Joined: Jun 29, 2008
    Posts: 123

    Joe Johnston
    Member
    from Ohio

    Clean out the rot with a rotary file, TIG weld, and remachine. Good as new.
     
  4. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,111

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    I've seen, (and ran) worse............If ya' cant poke a hole through it, glass bead it, (preferable), or sand blast the area, and use some good epoxy on it...............Smooth with a putty knife, let it cure, and block it flat, so you have a smooth , flat sealing surface, and let it ride.
     
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  5. George G
    Joined: Jun 28, 2005
    Posts: 1,230

    George G
    Member


    Is that code for JB weld?
     
  6. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,111

    stealthcruiser
    Member



    Yup, same stuff....................other folks make it too, 3M makes some fine product, but the brand name escapes me at the moment.....
     
  7. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,126

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    I'll have to go with FNG-Joe Johnston .... grind, tig & hand dress. Good as new!!

    Paco
     
  8. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 1,777

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

  9. What STEALTHCRUISER said...only I'd carefully flat file it to smooth it...
     
  10. tommy
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 14,736

    tommy
    Member

    That's what I'd do. This was an accepted repair on some of the aluminum Chevy intakes from the 90s.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2010
  11. CGkidd
    Joined: Mar 2, 2002
    Posts: 2,386

    CGkidd
    Member

    Concure with using the epoxy for the easy fix. If you have the time and know how tig it for a more professional finish. But no one will see it, so it is a matter with what you are more comfortable with.
     
  12. Von Rigg Fink
    Joined: Jun 11, 2007
    Posts: 13,437

    Von Rigg Fink
    Member
    from Garage

    Ive done the epoxy thing..it works
    but good prep is the key to it lasting..get all the shit out of there, and etch the aluminum or rough it up so the epoxy has some tooth to bite into.
    nothing worse than having your repair show up in your radiator, or water pump.

    sometimes if its not too bad or deep..a good layer of RTV will seal it..again if it is cleaned well of all the aluminum corrosion

    media blasting the area would be my choice for the clean up
     
  13. brad chevy
    Joined: Nov 22, 2009
    Posts: 2,629

    brad chevy
    Member

    There is a product for the repair ,its made for metal repair and they have one for aluminum to,I think its called Def-con,but not sure,used some on a turbo manifold an a diesel engine and it worked good. Not positive about the name been a long time ago.
     
  14. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,111

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    That too, just keep in mind, that MOST, R T V's are corrosive, that is, if they have that vinegar smell.......................It is Acetic acid, and it works well, ( sarcasm), with aluminum!!!

    As long as there is no vinegar smell, all is good on some minor damage.....
     
  15. Von Rigg Fink
    Joined: Jun 11, 2007
    Posts: 13,437

    Von Rigg Fink
    Member
    from Garage


    oh you know thats a dam good point..glad you brought that up..because i have seen that shit fuck up nice aluminum over the years..
    if using aluminum covers..i should have said use a non hardening non Acetic gasket adhesive..
    my bad for not bringing that up..thanks for the wake up call SC:cool:
     
  16. Engine Pro 5X
    Joined: Feb 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,186

    Engine Pro 5X
    Member

    ### Dev-Con >>>>.
     
  17. orange crush
    Joined: Jun 21, 2005
    Posts: 296

    orange crush
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I bought some low temp aluminum welding rods at a swap meet . You need to get everything real clean, but they melt with a propane torch and flow like lead. carlg
     
  18. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 25,737

    porknbeaner
    Member

    I was going to say JB Weld. I think its the same thing as epoxy.

    You best and cheapest way to repair it. Why look for a 20 dollar cure for a 10 cent problem.
     
  19. mrkling
    Joined: Oct 30, 2009
    Posts: 142

    mrkling
    Member

    Thanks for the replies. The JB weld is hardening as we speak.
     
  20. mrkling
    Joined: Oct 30, 2009
    Posts: 142

    mrkling
    Member

    JB weld is holding. No leaks as of yet. We'll see how long it last. Thanks for the advice.
     
  21. Hal_396
    Joined: Apr 14, 2009
    Posts: 313

    Hal_396
    Member

    Keep us posted on the JB weld fix. I used it a few times in the distant past and it has never failed me.
     
  22. Never2low
    Joined: Jan 14, 2008
    Posts: 788

    Never2low
    Member

    If that doesn't work I've got a bunch of Alumi-weld lying around. All you need is a torch to melt it in, then clean up with a file. I can cut a stick in half and mail it for free. Hell, I'll even break the piggy bank for the stamp:D:cool:
     
  23. Is it a rare intake? I have done the JB Shuffle a time or two...
     
  24. dawford
    Joined: Apr 25, 2010
    Posts: 498

    dawford
    Member

    JB Weld has an aluminum weld product.

    I have restored very old Hit and Miss engines, Windmills, outboard motors, transmissions and about every other thing you can imagine with various JB Weld products and I have had very good luck with them.

    Read and follow the directions. I talked to a heavy equipment mechanic who said that he has saved many thousand dollars repairing castings on heavy equipment with JB Weld. Naturally he was talking about engine and transmission parts not weight bearing parts.

    I know that this advice dosn't apply to this manifold problem but it has saved me several times when a casting has broken.

    I some times Butt weld broken castings back together then drill and tap thru the weld and JB Weld hard steel bolts in the holes. I then cut off the heads of the bolts even with the surface. When doing this I grind the side of the threads so that the excess JB Weld that I put on the threads and in the tapped hole can ouze out. After grinding the threads and before running the bolts in run a hardened nut over the threads to clean them up and test them in the holes without the JB.

    :) :) :) Dick :) :) :)
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2010

  25. You think it would work for a mounting hole flange that broke off ?? I have an old Fenton intake and one of the mounting holes busted off. I would need to build upabout an inch or so before filing it down and drilling it.
     
  26. Never2low
    Joined: Jan 14, 2008
    Posts: 788

    Never2low
    Member

    I've never put a ton of torque on it, but I've seen a couple people do that very same thing to a bell housing. I would say, if strength is going to be an issue, I would have a piece of 1/2" aluminum plate tig welded on and ground to fit, then drill it out. Maybe someone can chime in on the strength issue, but if you want to try it, I can send a stick. I've only got about 40 sticks, collecting dust.:eek:
     
  27. mrkling
    Joined: Oct 30, 2009
    Posts: 142

    mrkling
    Member

    Thanks for the offer Never2low, I'll keep it in mind. I'm hoping that I won't have to remove the intake for a while. The intake is off a tuned port engine. This being the first time that I've taken apart a fuel injected engine, it was somewhat painful! Once I figured it all out, I gotta say its pretty simple. It has fewer parts that a carb engine. Too bad it's not as cool!
     
  28. oldguard
    Joined: Jul 6, 2007
    Posts: 1,988

    oldguard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Epoxies are a modern marvel for sure, prep is everything with them, cant stick to dirty greasy surfaces. We have repaired many items and never had a failure due to the epoxy. I have even seen the adventuresome folks drill and tap it with amazing sucess.
     
  29. tommy
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 14,736

    tommy
    Member

    That's a job for your local tig welder. A good TIG welder can build up the aluminum so that it can be ground back down and shaped to what has broken off. Epoxy won't hold up ant it won't match the intake.

    [​IMG]

    This had 3 fins with missing pieces. I had it welded for 20 bucks.

    [​IMG]

    I did my own grinding, filing and polishing.
     
  30. Abone29
    Joined: Mar 20, 2007
    Posts: 234

    Abone29
    Member

    Bead blast it really clean and fill it with MarineTex,let it cure and file it smooth.I've got one on an off topic car for about 5 years now that was at least that bad.This stuff sets as hard as a preacher's dick.
     

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