View Full Version : KD Tools - Quality or Crap?


burger
10-02-2005, 08:10 PM
This afternoon I tried to flare SST brake line with a KD tools flaring tool set that I picked up from NAPA (about $50). It looks like a quality tool, but it wouldn't grip the tubing. Instead, when I tried to flare the tube would push out of the tools instead of bending into a flare. Is it a bad tool or is SST just that hard to bend? Is KD a good brand in general?


Thanks,
Ed

PS- This tool has worked well on many other occasions to flare plain steel tubing. This is the first time I've ever used SST with this tool.

Slag Kustom
10-02-2005, 08:13 PM
on stainless i would put the clamp part in my bench vise to make sure there was a good grip on the tubing. most times kd tools work pretty good but not as well as snap on or mac.

noboD
10-02-2005, 08:23 PM
I agree, I'd say it was the stainless. KDs are made in Lancaster, Pa. and are fairly good quality. I just used one last wekend on the side of the road to repair a fuel line, worked good. It even left little bity marks in my copper tube.

squirrel
10-02-2005, 08:40 PM
the KD tools are generally good quality, not premium, but not junk either. I've only used my KD flare tool on steel lines, it usually but not always works pretty well.

CharlieLed
10-02-2005, 09:20 PM
I am running all stainless lines on the Merc and while looking for a flaring tool found that there are many available but only a few actually advertised that they were designed for stainless....the others advised against using on SS. Sounds like you have a good tool, it just wasn't designed for how it was being used.

oil*can*harry
10-02-2005, 09:49 PM
My flaring tool has little grooves in the area that holds the tubing.
Also,in the instructions, it says to tighten the wing nut closest to the tubing.
I just did some 1/4" stainless and it worked good.
Oh, another thing. In the instructions, it says to chamfer the outside of the tubing. Did you do that? If not, you are putting more strain on the system.

burger
10-03-2005, 01:50 PM
Thanks for the replies, guys. I'm glad to hear that the tool I bought isn't a turd. That being said, it looks like I wont be using stainless line until I get a tool that's designed for it.


Thanks,
Ed

jerry
10-03-2005, 04:52 PM
From what I remember stainless doesnot need to be double flared. Plain steel needs to be double flared because of the seam from when the tubing is made.

Anybody else know for sure if this is true or not?

If not I have to redo my truck since I did it in stainless with single flares. Haven't had any problems yet.

Might be the source of your flaring problems if you are trying to do a double on stainless.


jerry

Digger_Dave
10-03-2005, 06:48 PM
From what I remember stainless doesnot need to be double flared. Plain steel needs to be double flared because of the seam from when the tubing is made.

Anybody else know for sure if this is true or not?

If not I have to redo my truck since I did it in stainless with single flares. Haven't had any problems yet.

Might be the source of your flaring problems if you are trying to do a double on stainless.


jerry

Usually SST is only flared ONCE.
If your hooking up to AN fittings, ONE flare, 37 deg flaring tool.

jerry
10-03-2005, 07:01 PM
Thanks for the confimation of my info Dave. Don't want to be spreading the wrong infomation.


jerry