View Full Version : When was the first Chevrolet V8 made?


Flathead Youngin'
06-07-2005, 11:36 PM
Are you sure of that? :)

Boyd Who
06-07-2005, 11:37 PM
Around 1915 or 16, if'n I remember correctly.

TERPU
06-07-2005, 11:38 PM
Are you sure of that? :)


1917 then not again until 1954 to be put into the Jive five and the rest is history. Check out the book about Ed Cole it's got all kinds of cool stuff in it. One cool thing is that Ed Cole's 54 Chevy hardtop had the very first one in it.

TERPU

caseyscustoms
06-07-2005, 11:39 PM
hell i thought it was 55/ 56.

caseyscustoms
06-07-2005, 11:40 PM
i know you could get one as an option on a 55 vette

Flathead Youngin'
06-07-2005, 11:40 PM
Crap, you guys are fast! My grandpa loves to get "Chevy guys" with that one....

they'll just argue and argue....that's the kind of stuff that's fun at car shows and cruise ins....

He says he actually saw one in a barn when he was a young boy and that later he read it in a book........

Here's a link.....to verify it

http://www.novak-adapt.com/knowledge/chevy_small_block_v8.htm

caseyscustoms
06-07-2005, 11:42 PM
i am only 20 so i shouldnt even know but i was always listenin when they would argue.

36-3window
06-08-2005, 01:50 AM
1917

Thriftmaster
06-08-2005, 02:33 AM
The first V8 that just so happes to have been an over head valve was offered buy Chevrolet in thier 1916 touring car and discontinued in 1918 for the grand sume of $1300.00

Tim
06-08-2005, 08:01 AM
as a side note the chevrolet brothers actualy made flathead ford four cylinder head conversions and speed parts , called frontys? and ater after having there own name tradmarked by some one else released stuff under the name of the town they were from before they imigrated to america

CruZer
06-08-2005, 08:05 AM
Fronty as in Frontenac,France.
That 1917 V8 didn't even have valve covers !!!!!! Must have been a noisy fxxxer.

stickylifter
06-08-2005, 08:12 AM
I thought it was 1978. That's as far as the AutoZone computers go back, and computers are smart as we all know, so nothing could be much older.

An interesting side note: Color was not available back then. Everything was in black and white until about 1976.

You learn something new every day, don't you?

Deuce Rails
06-08-2005, 08:16 AM
Overhead valve V-8 in 1916/1917?
That's pretty cool trivia, and a really advanced design.

Flathead Youngin'
06-08-2005, 08:20 AM
Since we're on the subject, what was Chevrolet's name before it was known as Chevrolet?

I haven't verified this one......but gramps claims this...

mtflat
06-08-2005, 08:30 AM
As with other early V8's I believe that block was made in pieces and bolted together. Correct me if I'm wrong - this is also part of the interesting trivia. Troubled with expense, leaks and weight problems it was dropped after a quick try-out period. It was one of those curiosities that pushed the edge of possibility divided the automotive camps. Some were sure it could never be practical - others kept dreaming.

It wasn't until '32 that a light weight, one-piece V8 casting made history.

Mutt
06-08-2005, 09:01 AM
Since we're on the subject, what was Chevrolet's name before it was known as Chevrolet?

I haven't verified this one......but gramps claims this...



It was always Chevrolet - if you're referring to the company.


Mutt

flatordead
06-08-2005, 11:22 AM
The Pioneer Auto Museum (SD) has one on display. I have a pic, but no scanner.

Bruce Lancaster
06-08-2005, 11:43 AM
It was always Chevrolet - if you're referring to the company.


Yeah, I think the company was created for a specific marketin plan, namely offering a slightly upscale competitor for the T--the V8 one obviously wasn't part of that plan, though. The main models of the time were four bangers in a chassis slightly longer than a T. "Chevrolet" had little connection with the Chevrolets, just a name chosen for marketing, as if someone brought out a "Petty" now.
I've heard of that V8 model being referred to as a "Mason" design--no idea why.

Bruce Lancaster
06-08-2005, 01:19 PM
Aha--Mason was another company, absorbed into Chevrolet to produce engines. And Chevrolet did have a short run as an independent company before being folded in to Durant's grand plan. The "Little" auto company was also absorbed into Chevy.

Tim
06-08-2005, 01:46 PM
speedy bills got a few in his colletion, as well as a frontenac car made by them. its a speedster looking thing

Flathead Youngin'
06-08-2005, 03:16 PM
Aha--Mason was another company, absorbed into Chevrolet to produce engines. And Chevrolet did have a short run as an independent company before being folded in to Durant's grand plan. The "Little" auto company was also absorbed into Chevy.


Very good Mr. Lancaster. Little was Chevrolet before we know it as it is today.....

Dang, I thought I had em'!!! Lancaster, you stay out of this!!! :):)

Bruce Lancaster
06-08-2005, 03:20 PM
It's still silly that they were wasting all that steel on non-Fords back then.

Mutt
06-08-2005, 04:08 PM
Very good Mr. Lancaster. Little was Chevrolet before we know it as it is today.....

Dang, I thought I had em'!!! Lancaster, you stay out of this!!! :):)


Actually, Little Motor Car Company, Mason Motor Company, and Chevrolet Motor Car Company were interrelated ventures by William Durant, launched in 1911 at the same time.
The Little Four and Six and Chevrolet's Six Type C Classic and Model H were popular, but it was the Chevrolet "490", with electric lights and self starter that got the attention of the public in 1915. The sales of the Chevrolet 490 caused Henry Ford to reduce the price of a model T to $440.00 because of the competition.
Below is a picture of a 1912 Little Four (Roadster), and the 1912 Chevrolet Classic Six (Touring).

Mutt

alchemy
06-08-2005, 04:10 PM
It's still silly that they were wasting all that steel on non-Fords back then.

They didn't waste steel, they were half wood.

G V Gordon
06-08-2005, 05:26 PM
A local collector has a 1918 touring with the V8. Cool looking motor, nicknamed "baby grand" because of the exposed valve train.

choprods
06-08-2005, 05:29 PM
AND.....Did you know why they discontinued the V-8 in 1918?

They said it broke down and overheated frequently and got poor mileage......IMAGINE THAT?!:D

Jimmy B
06-08-2005, 08:09 PM
1918 Chev V8
http://www.forengines.com/mystery2.jpg
http://www.msdignition.com/powertour/pt_2002/sized/DSCN0675.jpg

Oakland & Oldsmobile also had a V8s around 1918

Shakey Jakey
06-08-2005, 08:33 PM
I have heard it had but 2 main bearings. Think that crank may have flexed a bit?

Revhead
06-08-2005, 08:48 PM
I have heard it had but 2 main bearings. Think that crank may have flexed a bit?


I bet it didn't flex much at all considering the compression ration and redline that thing probably had. :D

noboD
06-08-2005, 08:51 PM
I have heard it had but 2 main bearings. Think that crank may have flexed a bit?
Anyone know where the bowtie came from? There's a bronze statue of Louis Chevrolet at the Indy museum. He raced there in the early days, died almost pennyless.

jerry
06-08-2005, 10:17 PM
From what i recall reading is that the chevy bow tie came from a wall paper design that he saw in a hotel room in france.


jerry

Deuce Rails
06-09-2005, 08:01 AM
From what i recall reading is that the chevy bow tie came from a wall paper design that he saw in a hotel room in france.


jerry

William Durant said that he got the logo from a wallpaper design in Paris; his daughter said that he designed it during dinner at home. It made its first appearance in 1913.

Interestingly, Durant hated Chevrolet the man. He was too rough around the edges for Durant's taste. Durant, however, absolutely loved his name.

Model A Vette
06-11-2005, 08:54 PM
I've read that Chevrolet bought back as many of those original V8's as they could. The bad publicity was not helping them! I wonder if they ever considered buying back any of their later mistakes!!

InjectorTim
06-11-2005, 09:38 PM
I would never have guessed, thats an interesting bit of trivia.

fab32
06-11-2005, 11:46 PM
Don't know if its true or not but I heard that you had to take an oil can and squirt down the valvetrain occasionally on those early v8s. If true, that certainly could have led to them being discontinued.


Frank

cosmo
06-12-2005, 01:11 AM
Don't know if its true or not but I heard that you had to take an oil can and squirt down the valvetrain occasionally on those early v8s. If true, that certainly could have led to them being discontinued.Frank

Ever ride with a Nimbus rider??

You DO have to oil those rockers...and if the engine don't...

Cosmo

gierhed
06-12-2005, 01:37 AM
Someone just brought up to to me tonight that The Ford flathead V8 was actually a Chevrolet design?

Flathead Youngin'
06-12-2005, 09:56 AM
Someone just brought up to to me tonight that The Ford flathead V8 was actually a Chevrolet design?


The Chevrolet was an over head design with exposed push rods. The flathead was a, well, flathead. The valves are in the block and it's a single cast engine. The early Cheb was several castings bolted together......too expensive to mass produce. This is why Henry worked so long to design a one pc. cast block for the flatty...

However, I'm sure Henry looked at the design to see what they did wrong....:) And they were wrong for many years after that! :D

Now, go set that fella straight!

gearhead1940
06-12-2005, 10:25 AM
1918 Chev V8
http://www.forengines.com/mystery2.jpg
http://www.msdignition.com/powertour/pt_2002/sized/DSCN0675.jpg

Oakland & Oldsmobile also had a V8s around 1918

When the flattie guys start yelling "real engines don't have valve covers" I don't think they would know what to say about this....

Flathead Youngin'
06-12-2005, 10:42 AM
When the flattie guys start yelling "real engines don't have valve covers" I don't think they would know what to say about this....


still holds true...they should have stuck with that design :p

rattlecanrods
06-12-2005, 11:15 AM
[QUOTE=Jimmy B]1918 Chev V8
http://www.forengines.com/mystery2.jpg
http://www.msdignition.com/powertour/pt_2002/sized/DSCN0675.jpg

The interesting part is the valvetrain of 1915 looks similar to pushrod motors of today.... These guys had it figured out 90years ago. Their sparkplg location looks a little sketchy though.....

Gotgas
06-12-2005, 11:23 AM
It's always interesting to take a look at the engineering inside those old engines. Hell, it took a team of modern engineers to get an original Wright Flyer engine to work. :D
It's still silly that they were wasting all that steel on non-Fords back then.
LOL, that is signature material there.

Bruce Lancaster
06-13-2005, 08:35 AM
When the flattie guys start yelling "real engines don't have valve covers" I don't think they would know what to say about this....
Hmmm...they better get their nomenclature straight before thev start yipping.
To quote the 1928-32 parts manual, part 18-6520 is "cover (Valve chamber)".
You might think of it as a flathead intake manifold, but...

Flathead Youngin'
06-20-2005, 08:48 PM
found this....pretty neat!

I know the site has been linked before, but I think this brochure is new...

http://www.tocmp.com/brochures/Chev/1913/index.html


Actually, Little Motor Car Company, Mason Motor Company, and Chevrolet Motor Car Company were interrelated ventures by William Durant, launched in 1911 at the same time.
The Little Four and Six and Chevrolet's Six Type C Classic and Model H were popular, but it was the Chevrolet "490", with electric lights and self starter that got the attention of the public in 1915. The sales of the Chevrolet 490 caused Henry Ford to reduce the price of a model T to $440.00 because of the competition.
Below is a picture of a 1912 Little Four (Roadster), and the 1912 Chevrolet Classic Six (Touring).

Mutt

tecolote14
05-20-2011, 09:27 PM
here is pics of car and engine

http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww38/tecolote14/DSCF9325.jpg
http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww38/tecolote14/DSCF9324.jpg

mgtstumpy
05-20-2011, 10:34 PM
Here goes:)