View Full Version : WD-40 is better than GIBBS ?!?


Bugman
09-30-2008, 07:55 PM
After hearing about Gibbs Brand metal protector used on bare metal cars for years, I decided to get some to try on Hawkeye and Hot Rod Pat's bare metal '53 Chevy. They'd been using WD-40 on it, but it doesn't last all that long, and dust sticks to it. Since they're off at college, I decided to do a head to head comparison with the WD-40 and the Gibbs. I welded a hoop to a piece of sheetmetal, sanded the whole thing with a DA, cleaned it with brake cleaner, then sprayed half with WD-40, and half with Gibbs. To accelorate my test, I hung it in my shower. Once a day, I'd briefly run it under the water and hang it back up.

After only a week, I had rust starting to form. To my utter shock, the GIBBS SIDE started rusting first. What the heck? I thought this stuff was supposed to be the best stuff ever, and fully expected it to far outlast the WD-40?!? And yet, it started rusting before even lowley WD-40. What are your thoughts on this?

*note: In the pic, the left side is WD-40, the right is Gibbs. You can see the bright newly formed rust spots on the metal.

Tman
09-30-2008, 08:26 PM
Ooooo, Dave is going to love this one;)

droplord49
09-30-2008, 08:28 PM
Regardless of which one holds up better, WD40 has silicone in it. Silicone makes paint bubble and fisheye and is almost impossible to get rid of once you have saturated the metal with it.

Sam F.
09-30-2008, 08:37 PM
did you spray the metal hoop too?



looks like rusty water from the hoop that has beeded up on the sheetmetal and dried.

Bugman
09-30-2008, 08:44 PM
Unlike many lubricants, WD-40 does NOT contain silicone, so with a proper cleaning/degreasing it can be painted over with no issues. Just today I painted an old foundry mold cart that had been sandblasted and drenched in WD-40. Brake cleaner, followed by Wax and Grease remover, and I didn't get a single fisheye.

I did not spray the hoop, it's still covered in mill scale and is not yet rusting. Also, water doesn't run/drip off that in a way that it lands on the sheetmetal. I've been watching the rust spots grow daily too.

Tman
09-30-2008, 09:54 PM
Nice experiment Bug! The hoop is not cast though is it? I would be afraid of said hoop breaking and causing the sheetmetal to go flying across the yard and cutting the neighbors cat................or cow in half!?!?!?

Paul2748
09-30-2008, 10:05 PM
WD-40 is supposed to be a water displacement if I remember correctly. As Far as Gibbs advertising, I don't think it says it will protect under conditions where the object is washed with water, am not sure about the displacement factor.

I think the test should be coating the object and then leaving it out (but not outside subject to rain) to see what happens. In a rain situation, I doubt anything will stay unrusted for very long.

I bet the WD-40 side will eventually get just as bad as the Gibbs side as the water washes it off.

lonewolfstreetrods
09-30-2008, 10:07 PM
. What are your thoughts on this?


1: You have too much time on your hands. :D

2: You are single, because as tollerable as my wife is with car parts everywhere, hanging sheet metal in the shower,,,,,,well,,,, you must be single.:cool:

3: My father thinks WD-40 is liquid gold. So that side should NEVER rust according to his lifelong rantings.

4: Dave is going to pucker up after seeing this and won't crap for a week (following the INSTANT crap he has once he sees it,lol).

Brad54
09-30-2008, 10:10 PM
WD-40: Water Displacement formula 40. The other 39 tries were duds.

-Brad

Shifty Shifterton
09-30-2008, 10:11 PM
Unlike many lubricants, WD-40 does NOT contain silicone, so with a proper cleaning/degreasing it can be painted over with no issues. Just today I painted an old foundry mold cart that had been sandblasted and drenched in WD-40. Brake cleaner, followed by Wax and Grease remover, and I didn't get a single fisheye.

Interesting test, thanks for passing it along

For what it's worth the foundry probably exposed that mold cart to more silicone than you ever could. Them boys love all forms of silicone release agents.

Bugman
09-30-2008, 10:33 PM
The hoop is some grade of spring steel. It's mild enough that it's got some spring to it, but can still be bent and formed. No chance of it breaking, it's pre bent into the U and there's no tension on it.

My original intent was to just let the humidity in the bathroom do the rusting on it's own, but I'm sometimes impatient, and I know the car gets caught in the rain so I figured hitting it directly with water would be more realistic.

I will say that the water beads up MUCH better on the Gibbs. Water on the WD spreads out flat like water on an unwaxed and neglected hood, where as the Gibbs beads up like freshly waxed paint.

1, yes, I do have to much time on my hands, and
2, yes, I'm single, but even if I werent...um...ok, i see your point

:)

lonewolfstreetrods
09-30-2008, 10:35 PM
But if you do find a gal that will let you hang that in your shower,,,,, thats a keeper.

Cruiser
09-30-2008, 11:01 PM
Very interesting thread and worth proving a point. Would like to see you do it again and let time in the outdoors do it's thing with the rusting.

CRUISER :cool:


MAD SCIENTIST AT WORK - BUGMAN

R. Seghi
09-30-2008, 11:04 PM
WD-40 means: WATER DISPLACEMENT, GOT IT RIGHT ON THE 40TH TRY. no lie.

Royalshifter
09-30-2008, 11:07 PM
Metal protection yes......but not outside in a rainstorm.

Mr48chev
09-30-2008, 11:11 PM
And it works damned well at getting the condensation out of front mount Ford distributor caps after it rains.

R. Seghi
09-30-2008, 11:15 PM
And it works damned well at getting the condensation out of front mount Ford distributor caps after it rains.


and that's what it's for, not a rainstorm.

51Gringo
09-30-2008, 11:36 PM
nice tasters choice, but what are you doing? keeping a car in bare outside in the rain? Gibbs has proven to me without a dought to be way better about keeping a car outside in the elements with some sprinkle but not fully drenched in rain. I swear by it. I've had Watcha II outside for two years now and it needs a coat of Gibb's every 3 to 4 months and no rust.

teddisnoke
09-30-2008, 11:40 PM
http://images42.fotki.com/v1312/photos/4/42437/6750441/IMG_4848-vi.jpg

Thats the front fender of my very patina'd '65 Nova wagon, slathered in a mist of WD-40, to help bring back a glorious shine.You can actually see reflection, which blows me away as the poriginal paint is so shot. The $3.50 can was a great investment, as the BBQ I attended had magazine editors aplenty, and they took quite a few of mine to plug into some type of story, no doubt about how crappy it looked amonst the show rides. They laughed when I told them what I used for "wax", and warned them to not rub up against the car for fear they might "remove" my pristine shine!!!:D:eek:

Shifty Shifterton
09-30-2008, 11:44 PM
nice tasters choice, but what are you doing? keeping a car in bare outside in the rain?

Round here in the spring, when the ground is still cold and the air warms up- if your garage isn't climate controlled you're likely to find a layer of condensate on everything metal if the weather turns warm & humid in the afternoon.

noboD
10-01-2008, 05:46 AM
OK Bugman, now paint both sides.

onedge
10-01-2008, 06:09 AM
bugman you are hard core!

zzford
10-01-2008, 06:13 AM
The WD 40 may prevent rust better than the Gibbs, but, 9 out of 10 people prefer the taste of GIbbs in a double blind taste test.

Bugman
10-01-2008, 06:55 AM
OK Bugman, now paint both sides.
That's the plan a few weeks into the exparament :) I'll be sure to post those results too, although I don't expect either side to cause any problems.

hrm2k
10-01-2008, 07:27 AM
This thread made me laugh. A couple of weeks ago, a small rag covered in WD40 landed on the cowl of my T. I instantly took it off and wiped the remaining WD-40 off. I couldn't believe how good it looked......so I WD-40'd all the blue paint on my T. It does look good now. The gloss tones down after about 24 hours and leaves a really nice sheen. One more use for WD-40!!

BigNick1959
10-01-2008, 08:14 AM
Here's a little trick that i've been doing for the last 20 years. After I'm done airbrushing for the day i clean it out and then blast some WD 40 through it!. It keeps any paint i missed in the airbrush from drying and keeps the seals in good shape. The best part is when people see me do it, they freak out! The next day I run a little thinner through the brush and it's good to go, have never had a problem with paint not sticking, fish eyes etc. TRY IT!
I LOVE WD40

belair
10-01-2008, 08:15 AM
Old-timers used to gloss up a faded paint job with Kerosene-the wonder drug of the 30's.

billandbeaufort
10-01-2008, 09:37 AM
Perhaps we have overlooked the chlorine. If your water is chlorinated, it might be corrosive and more easily wash off the lube? A straight real world humidity only test would be good.

novadude
10-01-2008, 12:07 PM
Dale... very cool Nova photo! :)

Kilroy
10-01-2008, 01:03 PM
Old-timers used to gloss up a faded paint job with Kerosene-the wonder drug of the 30's.

That's cause you can actually thin old school Lacquer with Kerosene and shoot it... Some guys even used gasolene I've heard...

It just thins the top layer and spreads it around...

I don't think I'd try Kerosene on modern paint though. :)

ShakeyPuddin55
10-01-2008, 01:28 PM
I thought Gibbs was a magnesium wheel coating?

I think Mr. Mann took his ball and went home.

BigChief
10-01-2008, 06:01 PM
We use both WD and Gibbs at my buddies machine shop and in WNY we get our fair share of cold ground/cold concrete/cold iron, warm humid air days where condensation literally drips off everything. We've found that Gibbs seems to protect machined/clean engine parts better than WD40...I think it gets deeper into the metal than the WD. My sandblasted and machined Y-block heads have been sitting in the shop most of the summer and have barely changed colors where as the bare parts are hazed somewhat and the WD parts are just starting to grow 'measles'. The WD does work wonders on drying out items that are water wet, however.

My other life is spent in testing laboratories doing such nonsence as this.....next time around don't weld anything to your "test coupons". Punch or drill a hole and use zip strips or string to hang the metal parts from. Clean them up the same way as you did before and repeat the test...use new samples, not used ones and don't reuse the old test part. Like the others said, I doubt either of these products will hold up under water wash conditions, however, just leaving them in the bathroom (or maybe hang them high at the far end of the bathtub) to get minimal direct spray but plenty of humidity will be a better evaluation of the products and would be closer to thier intended use.

-Bigchief.

Shifty Shifterton
10-01-2008, 06:13 PM
Old-timers used to gloss up a faded paint job with Kerosene-the wonder drug of the 30's.

Kerosene smells like a key ingredient in buffing compounds. Which, like kerosene should not be left on the paint for months, because it will cause permanent damage like discoloration or even cracking.

I also knew of a mid 60s ford truck (in the mid 80s) that had been annually wiped with 30W every fall as a rust preventative. The painted part of the truck was solid, even though the paint job was shattered into a million pieces from the petroleum's drying effect. Everything under the truck was a rust hole, or dirt covering a rust hole. The scheme sorta worked I suppose.

Halfton65
10-12-2008, 06:12 PM
Not sure about panel protection but I use LPS1 because it doesn't gum up like WD40. It's worked well/been cleaner all these years. If anyone is bored I'd like to see how it performs in the same experiment.

sawzall
10-12-2008, 07:43 PM
Perhaps we have overlooked the chlorine. If your water is chlorinated, it might be corrosive and more easily wash off the lube? A straight real world humidity only test would be good.

right! in neighborhood ACID rain falls.. thats more real world than chlorinated water..

I think bugmans test is LESS aggressive than real world..

Rustahaulic
10-12-2008, 08:08 PM
I've been using both for a long time...
WD-40 all my life, and Gibbs for at least the last 10 years...Although WD-40 is a better deal dollar for dollar, Gibbs is a FAR superior product. WD-40 has H2O in the formula, Gibbs does not, (it's actually a H2O inhibitor) this also makes it "gun friendly" where I DO NOT recommend you use WD-40 your favorite boom-stick!
Both good products, but not really comperable...
Just my $00.02...........:)

RustyBolts
10-13-2008, 02:05 PM
Gibbs works great as long as you keep the parts indoors and out of the rain. In the rain, it washes off and the metal starts to rust.

Putting bare steel in the rain is a bad idea anyway.

A better test would be to put Gibbs and WD-40 on some clean bare steel and leave it in the cold damp garage for a few months. I think for that test, the Gibbs will probably win. WD-40 is sort of like kerosene, and it eventually dries up.

I don't believe WD-40 has silicone in it, because I have never had problems painting parts that had previously been soaked in WD-40. As long as you clean it well, the paint will stick fine.

Richard D
10-13-2008, 02:13 PM
WD-40 has H2O in the formula,
How can that be? I thought "WD" stood for Water Displacer.

Zeke Fishburn
10-13-2008, 02:32 PM
How can that be? I thought "WD" stood for Water Displacer.

Exactly!! And it's flammable! Don't ask me how I know.

LongT
10-13-2008, 02:49 PM
WD-40 has H2O in the formula, ...........:)

According to Wiki:

WD-40's main ingredients, according to U.S. Material Safety Data Sheet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_Safety_Data_Sheet) information, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoddard_solvent) (i.e., mineral spirits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mineral_spirits) -- primarily hexane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexane), somewhat similar to kerosene)
25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquefied_petroleum_gas) (presumably as a propellant; carbon dioxide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide) is now used instead to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability)
15+%: Mineral oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mineral_oil) (light lubricating oil)
10-%: Inert ingredients
The German version of the mandatory EU safety sheet lists the following safety relevant ingredients:

60-80%: Heavy Naphtha (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha) (petroleum product), hydrogen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen) treated
1-5%: Carbon dioxide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide)
It further lists flammability and effects to the human skin when repeatedly exposed to WD-40 as risks when using WD-40. Nitrile rubber (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrile_rubber) gloves (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloves) and safety glasses should be used. Water is unsuitable for extinguishing burning WD-40.
There is a popular urban legend (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_legend) that the main ingredient in WD-40 is fish oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_oil).<SUP class=reference id=cite_ref-1>[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40#cite_note-1)</SUP> Although it is unknown whether the formula contains fish oil, material safety data sheets for the product show that the main ingredient is Stoddard solvent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoddard_solvent), not fish oil.<SUP class=reference id=cite_ref-2>[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40#cite_note-2)</SUP>

[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=WD-40&action=edit&section=2)] Uses

Old61
10-13-2008, 02:51 PM
Read the faqs at their site:
http://www.wd40.com/faqs/#q13