View Full Version : Atlas Bucron Tires


novadude
09-03-2008, 08:00 PM
I keep hearing how Atlas Bucrons were the tires of choice in the early 1960s. What did they look like? Anyone have pics?

oldspert
09-03-2008, 08:35 PM
No pics, but they were made of almost pure butyl rubber. The center was almost like todays cheater slicks with a groove on each side around the tire. If you were lucky you could get 10,000 miles on a set. But they would stick like glue to the pavement.

olscrounger
09-03-2008, 08:58 PM
as stated --they were the real traction deal in 59/60/61. In the Central Valley we bought them at gas stations (Standard I think)==was the only place to get them--can't recall ever seeing or buying them at a regular tire store. I ran them at the drags in 59 or 60 on a 57 Pontiac and they really hooked up compared to regular tires. Lot of guys found they broke alot more stuff with these due to traction increase--especailly 55-57 stick shift Chevies.

stan292
09-03-2008, 09:57 PM
'dude-

The "Ol" guys are right on. Bucrons were the hot set-up until NHRA started allowing actual "Cheater Slicks" - treadless recaps (and later on, actual "purpose-built items) with two grooves.

Actually, the Bucrons were still better than a lot of the recaps.

VAPHEAD
09-03-2008, 10:16 PM
I would like to see a picture of those.Anyone?

novadude
09-04-2008, 07:57 AM
BTT... anyone have any pics?

BigNick1959
09-04-2008, 08:46 AM
My Father drove a truck for Standard oil co. in the 50's and 60's and they sold Atlas tires through Standard gas stations. He had a set on his '62 Catalina, I can rembember him raving about them. I only have one picture of the car but you really cant see the tires, I think the ones he ran were white walls but I maybe mistaken becouse I also remember the car with black walls.
It was along time ago!.

Shifty Shifterton
09-04-2008, 08:58 AM
Atlas was Amoco's own brand sold only at service stations, think they finally phased out in the late 80s and were anything but a premium tire by then. Certainly premium priced though. Atlas name was also applied to chemicals, wipers, filters, etc. Possibly still using it on their chemical line, those were notoriously decent.

tommy
09-04-2008, 09:12 AM
Atlas was Amoco's own brand sold only at service stations, think they finally phased out in the late 80s and were anything but a premium tire by then. Certainly premium priced though. Atlas name was also applied to chemicals, wipers, filters, etc. Possibly still using it on their chemical line, those were notoriously decent.

I think you mean ESSO before the name was changed to Exxon.. check here. (http://www.trivia-library.com/a/exxon-oil-company-random-facts-and-trivia.htm)

BigNick1959
09-04-2008, 09:12 AM
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll266/BigNick1959/esso60policetires.jpg

buford36
09-04-2008, 09:18 AM
I think you mean ESSO before the name was changed to Exxon.. check here. (http://www.trivia-library.com/a/exxon-oil-company-random-facts-and-trivia.htm)

Yep, it was Esso. I worked after school in an Esso station and I remember the Atlas brand tires. Bucrons were almost like a gum rubber eraser. They weren't really black in color either. They were sort of dark brown and quite soft. this was in '60/61. Tom...

Shifty Shifterton
09-04-2008, 09:28 AM
I think you mean ESSO before the name was changed to Exxon.. check here. (http://www.trivia-library.com/a/exxon-oil-company-random-facts-and-trivia.htm)

Apparently I do!

Engine Pro 5X
09-04-2008, 09:55 AM
We never had Esso in Kansas. It was Standard,Atlas,and Amoco. Those bucrons were good for traction but not a high mileage tire>>>.

fab32
09-04-2008, 10:14 AM
The hot ticket for traction back in the late 50's early 60's. We set a National Record (speed) in B/S at York Pennsylvania on Bucrons. That track was actually an airport runway and slightly downhill (right at the maximum allowed by NHRA. They would suspend racing for aircaft landings occasionally.

Frank

Mopar34
09-04-2008, 10:22 AM
Does anybody remember why the name ESSO was changed to Exxon?

The way I heard from a dealer friend was that ESSO gas wasn't selling in Japan because the name in Japanese meant "no go". So the company went looking for a name that had no meaning in any language. Exxon was it.

I grew up with ESSO, I've always thought it was a dumb change.:mad:

Jack Thomas
09-04-2008, 10:33 AM
Corky Coker are you lurking? Could be an opportunity. At our track we saw a lot of them when NHRA brought out the "pure stock" classes about 1967. By then they were old stock and hard to find.

cooljunk
09-04-2008, 10:39 AM
Yes I remember the Bucrons had the best traction of the day.

The urban mith around the midwest was that if you could burn them (peal out) they were free!

6t5frlane
09-04-2008, 10:41 AM
I worked at my fathers Esso station in the late 60's early 70's ( until 1st gas crisis ) We sold Atlas Bucrons. Put them on all kinds of cars. For some reason I do not remember Hot Rodders flocking in to get them....

pasadenahotrod
09-04-2008, 11:02 AM
Cheapjohn tires generally have the softest rubber, which gives the best traction but not the best mileage and long tire life. They also have less sidewall and tread fabric plies in their construction. I had the best traction and handling on my old 59 AH Bugeyed Sprite using Sears Guardsman tires which were $9.95 each in 1969. They just didn't last too long with that kind of driving.

racingonerobb
09-04-2008, 12:32 PM
I worked at an ESSO station in the late 50s, went thru their sales training, sold Bucrons, lots of guys wanted them but only a few ever bought them, mostly older guys. ESSO, Standard, SOHIO, and a few more, were all under the Standard Oil umbrella. I think they had to sell off some of them due to fair trade issues.

novadude
09-04-2008, 12:41 PM
School me on Standard Oil and tires... did they actually make their own tires? Was the Bucron a unique tire design and marketed by Standard Oil, or was it a rebranded Goodyear, Firestone, etc.? :confused:

amodel25
09-04-2008, 12:48 PM
I worked at a Goodyear store in the 60's. If a car came in with a set of Bucrons to trade in for Goodyears, there was a fight to see who got to keep the take-offs for their street racer. They were normally pretty worn and good for 500 or so miles, but they were Bucrons.

Gman0046
09-04-2008, 01:05 PM
Yep Atlas Bucron tires were sold by ESSO which is now EXXON. Correct me if I'm wrong but I seem to remember they had a red stripe on the sidewall. The name Butyl Rubber also rings a bell.

racingonerobb
09-04-2008, 01:16 PM
School me on Standard Oil and tires... did they actually make their own tires? Was the Bucron a unique tire design and marketed by Standard Oil, or was it a rebranded Goodyear, Firestone, etc.? :confused:

I think they were made by a major tire manufacturer exclusivly for Standard oil, don't know which one, maybe from overseas as they didn't publish who.

Hodad
09-04-2008, 01:26 PM
Atlas grip 4 safe tires and tubes 600-16 like new $100 OBO-Contact Information-Glenburn, ME

are these the ones you are talking about in this post.. on uncle henry's in Maine

novadude
09-04-2008, 01:37 PM
Hmmm... apparently Standard Oil invented Butyl rubber:


Butyl rubber was first developed in 1937, by researchers William J. Sparks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_J._Sparks) and Robert M. Thomas (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Robert_M._Thomas&action=edit&redlink=1), at Standard Oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Oil)'s (which became Exxon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon) in 1972) Linden, N.J. laboratory. Texas Petrochemicals and Lubrizol Corporation are one of the largest manufacturers of PIB in North America.

(Wikipedia - Butyl rubber. Also, Exxonmobil claims that they invented Butyl) http://www.butylrubber.com/Public_Products/Butyl/Butyl_Polymers/Worldwide/Btl_ProductFrontPage.asp

If they were pioneers in the field of synthetic rubbers, maybe ESSO DID manufature their own line of tires way back when? :confused:

enjenjo
09-04-2008, 08:35 PM
At one time, Seiberling tire co made Atlas tires. I think they ended up as Gateway tire co. Standard Oil co was broken up in 1910. Out of it came Esso, Sohio, Standard Oil, Amoco, Boron, and several others.

oldspert
09-04-2008, 08:43 PM
I had a set of 8.50 X 14's on a 50 Chevy fleetline with a dual quad 283 Corvette motor and a Warner 4-speed. Rear was a 55 chev running 4:11's. The damn thing would launch so hard the steering wheel would be ripped from your hands if you didn't get a good grip. Great street racing tires. Wish I could find some hidden away somewhere.

novadude
09-04-2008, 09:16 PM
Great street racing tires. Wish I could find some hidden away somewhere.

Sounds like they'd be a great item to reproduce if someone, somewhere could find details of the original construction / compound.

tubman
09-05-2008, 09:53 PM
I found this with Google. It shows them O.K.

Dean Lowe
09-05-2008, 10:31 PM
What about 'Vogue' WW's? Think Strickler and Hayden Proffitt used Vogues on their '61 and '62 cars.

Nicholson used Vogues too.

The Atlas Bucrons came from Standard stations. Had a greenish protective coating on the white wall that scrubbed off with an SOS pad. We called them "green walls". They were the shit until Inglewood Tire started capping cheater slicks.

NONAME
09-06-2008, 09:03 AM
In California Atlas Bucrons were sold only at Standard and Chevron stations (one was independant owned and the other were company stations) as far as 10,000 miles go thats B.S. no biased ply tire would last over 10,000 miles. the Bucrons wouldn't last 500 miles of strip or street racing. they would smoke for about 30 feet get hot and hook so hard it was like shifting gears if you didn't blow a rear end or drop a drive shaft. they were standard oils most expensive tire but still cheaper than the 75 dollar Vogue Tires that Dyno Don ran on his Chevys from 59-62

EDIT. I didn't read page two. all this has been covered so I'll second it .....Jim

owen thomas
09-06-2008, 10:02 AM
In Michigan we had Standard gas stations, not Esso. This is where we bought Atlas Bucron tires. You were lucky if the tread lasted a few hundred miles, or maybe one Sunday at the drags. I remember only whitewalls. The Standard stations also had those cool red plastic crown valve stem caps, shaped like the glass globe on top of their gas pumps. We didnít burn Standard gas back then though, nothing but Gulf Crest. The coolest looking tire was the Kelley Springfield Celebrity Ė whitewalls of course.

NONAME
09-06-2008, 10:29 AM
In Michigan we had Standard gas stations, not Esso. This is where we bought Atlas Bucron tires. You were lucky if the tread lasted a few hundred miles, or maybe one Sunday at the drags. I remember only whitewalls. The Standard stations also had those cool red plastic crown valve stem caps, shaped like the glass globe on top of their gas pumps. We didnít burn Standard gas back then though, nothing but Gulf Crest. The coolest looking tire was the Kelley Springfield Celebrity Ė whitewalls of course.

Chevron white pump 104 octane "Custom Supreme" was the westcoasts only choice for 13 1/2 compression street racers. not cheap at 36 cents a gallon in 1960-62

Mr48chev
09-06-2008, 10:42 AM
Up into the mid 70's they were the hot lick to run on your dirt track car at Heart of Texas Speedway in Waco.
The guys I worked (JT Carpenter and family) with were always hunting them out for their race cars then.
They were sold new through the service stations that were connected to Standard oil in one form or another.

buick320a
09-06-2008, 10:53 AM
In Indian we bought these tires for the Standard stations, I had them on my '62 BelAir "bubbe top" , used them only for street racing , damn thing would bite, but you would pull the rubber off of them . Their name to fame was that they were "round" thus giving you a good ride.

mtkawboy
09-06-2008, 02:47 PM
Ran them on my 427 powered 57 Ford in 63. They were about 4 inches wide with 2 grooves, one on each side all the way around the tire with small sipes down the middle. I was lucky if I got 2000 miles out of a set. Werent much but everyone ran from a slow roll back then on the street. As soon as Casler recap cheaters came out thet were history

Gman0046
09-06-2008, 03:53 PM
Never saw Bucrons only 4" wide or with anything down the middle.

Engine Pro 5X
09-06-2008, 06:14 PM
Yeah like I said earlier kick ass traction but low mileage>>>>.

Elrusto
09-06-2008, 07:18 PM
...............Wish I could find some hidden away somewhere.
Wallace Wade Tire in Dallas has ONE on display in his showroom.

k9racer
09-06-2008, 08:03 PM
After reading all the ESSO refrences all I could think about was the joke about the bee that was traviling with his friends. they all stoped for a brake at a shell station but he went to the ESSO station. so the punch line was theie is allways one ESSO BEE in every croud. Some racers from lasiter mountain drag strip worked out of the North Birmingham Esso and their altered ford was called the ""ESSO BEE"" I always refered to those atlas tires a axel breakers..

John356
09-07-2008, 05:19 PM
I worked at a Humble station back in the middle 60's we stocked Bucrons,but never sold many.They were expensive and wore out fast,but man would they stick. Recently I bought some deadstock tires, 5 of them were 9.50/14 Bucrons, 2 blackwalls I sold that same day to finance the deal, 2 Monza whitewalls I put on a 61 Mercury Meteor 600 and sold,, That leaves me with one wide white.

gkgeiger
09-07-2008, 05:28 PM
SOHIO was the Standard oil in Ohio. They had Bucrons. Firestone also had a Butyl tire, which was call a Butylair (the spelling could be wrong).

John356
09-08-2008, 05:12 AM
Humble was also in Ohio,we sold a complete line of Atlas products

lowkroozer
09-08-2008, 07:27 AM
Mopar34 Esso,Exxon, Standard Oil in the state of Ohio at that time were named Sohio but sold all Atlas products , Atlas Bucrons ,wiper blades,brake fluid. Back to the subject at the time excelent traction tire but no mileage. Beat the crap out of a set of them myself. Good memories!

Bugrancher
12-14-2008, 04:42 PM
I have posted some pictures of a never mounted 750 X 14 Bucron on one of my websites. I started working in Standard Stations in 1962. The first tires I sold was a set of Bucrons just like this one. They didn't wear worth a darn but they gripped the road like glue. The ride was soft but the tires did make some road noise. Hope this helps. Let me know if you have any questions, Jim

go to: http://www.636utah.com

56sedandelivery
12-14-2008, 05:29 PM
E.J. Potter, The Michigan Madman, was'nt he "known" for using Atlas Bucrons? In high school, 66-69, I worked for a Standard Chevron Dealer. I remember Bucrons as being the-bottom-of-the-line, cheapest tire, we sold, but I don't remember any droves of hotrodders coming in to buy them. I also don't remember them being anything but blackwalls. Butch/56sedandelivery.

Oh, I went to Meadowdale High School, and I worked at Meadowdale Chevron.

Bugrancher
12-14-2008, 05:55 PM
As I remember it the Milepak blackwall was the lowest cost tire, then the GripSafe, the Plycron, the Pacesetter(it may have been a little later when this came along) and the Bucron (always whitewall). I know when I sold Atlas tires the Bucron was the most expensive and I sold them to a few "fast cars" of the time but mostly I put them on Buicks and other big cars.

propwash
12-15-2008, 09:03 PM
reminder: ESSO stood for S.O. Standard Oil - all the Essos etc were derivatives of Standard Oil and most were renamed after the big Trust-busting of Rockefellers Oil company.

Atlas tires were made by any of the majors and were handled by the stations already mentioned as a "company" tire. Chevron dealers were privately owned Standard Oil stations. We used Bucrons all the time. Where I'm from you couldn't buy slicks, but you could buy Bucrons...a bit pricey, but I pumped gas at a Chevron all through HS, so the supplies were a bit cheaper. Very sticky tires.

dj

Little Wing
12-15-2008, 09:06 PM
The Esso Tiger :)

55 dude
12-15-2008, 09:11 PM
guys if i remember correctly enco turned to exxon? esso was a different company. my uncle had a enco station that changed to exxon in the early 70's.

novadude
12-15-2008, 10:03 PM
Bugrancher... thanks for the pics. Those things look like they'd be dangerous in the rain.

rustyrodsinmaywood
04-02-2013, 08:00 PM
I bought a set of atlas bucrons at the swap meet in l ville with m/t wheels on em

boogeracng
04-02-2013, 08:31 PM
Ahhhh, the good old days............I found out about Atlas Bucrons from my first service station job in 1964......Domian Standard Service in Ladue, MO. The owner (Gary) drove a big Cadillac with them, and changed them about 2 times a year. His customer base was big cars.....Cadillacs, Continentals, big Buicks and Olds, all owned by the high rollers in the area. They supplied a ride like being in your overstuffed coach. The takeoffs when they bought new became the "had to have" tires for the local hot rodders. They were literally soft enough in the tread, you could leave a fingernail impression. The dirt track guys ("jalopy cars") would search out every Standard station for miles looking for take-offs for their cars....they claimed they would hook better than anything else out there. I remember scouring the junkyards for them, and selling them to the racers to make a buck and finance my hot rod projects. Simple times....where did they go? Thanks to the originator of this topic......brings back a lot of great memories.

bobscogin
04-02-2013, 09:10 PM
And on a '65 Chevy with an L-78, they made burn out smoke like you wouldn't believe!

Bob

Ebbsspeed
04-02-2013, 09:19 PM
Here's a real bad picture of one.

Rick Sis
04-02-2013, 11:33 PM
I'm old enough that I should remember these, but they really don't ring a bell at all. I thought that the cheater recaps were already commonplace at the time stated that these were produced. The pics sure look cool! I think these could be awesome on the right car.

mow too much
04-03-2013, 06:02 AM
I remember cutting many a grove in them as a young kid, they were the tire of choice in the early 60's in OKC on Super Modified's.

Troublemaker427
04-03-2013, 06:13 AM
My father ran Atlas Bucron's on his '61 Starliner Super Stock car in '61-'63. He said they would really hook. He also bought them at a local Esso station. He said during the "active" street & drag racing season he would replace them about every two weeks.... I'd love to see these repoped today.

willbe
04-03-2013, 06:22 AM
How about Atlas plycrons? My late brother in law always raved about them.

tommy
04-03-2013, 06:28 AM
Always remember we are talking about Atlas Bucrons being compared to other bias ply tires of that era. If you were a street racer in the early 60s you ran Bucrons to get out of the hole, not for tread wear life.:D They were soft and gripped.

Gman0046
04-03-2013, 08:52 AM
The pictures show Bucrons much wider then 4".

NONAME
04-03-2013, 09:01 AM
like I said before Dyno Don Nicolson ran (and recommended) Vogue over Atlas Bucrons. another tire was Flying A dynapols which were less expensive. this was 1958-61 by 62 the hot cheater slicks were Casler,

bowie
04-03-2013, 09:27 AM
Rears on my coupe are NOS 6.70x15 Bucrons. Had them about 35yrs with the nubs on them. One day my son said " You`ll be dead and those nubs will still be there..." So we mounted them up and FRYED the nubs clean off of em. Don`t know I`ll go to far with them on the car; but man do they bite! Better close up pic in my avatar.

pasadenahotrod
04-03-2013, 09:42 AM
ESSO, ENCO, adn many other brand names were used by Standard Oil throughout the world. They decided to change to a single name for better name recognition and held a contest to choose the new name. EXXON was chosen because it had no problems with foreign translation and the double X which was very distinctive.

Pops1532
04-03-2013, 09:58 AM
Atlas was a joint venture in the TBA (Tires Batteries and Accessories) market between:
Standard Oil of New Jersey (Esso,Enco,Exxon),
Standard Oil Incorporated (Kyso),
Standard Oil Company of Indiana (Standard, Utoco, Standard Oil Co of Nebraska, Pan-Am, American, Amoco),
Standard Oil Company of California (Standard Stations Incorporated, Standard Oil, Chevron),
and Standard Oil Company of Ohio (Sohio).
They were all part of the Standard Oil Trust that the government broke up in 1911.
Like others have said they stuck like glue but didn't last long. I remember some old timers saying they were cheap enough that they price per mile worked out about the same as higher priced premium tires. I knew some dirt track guys that would get worn out Bucrons from the gas stations and groove them with a pocket knife.

George Klass
04-12-2013, 11:34 AM
http://i708.photobucket.com/albums/ww88/geoklass/Super%20Stock%20Chevrelot/untitleddyno_zpse9d9ecdb.jpg

Anyone that has ever heard of these tires might also enjoy this website:

http://georgeklass.net/

Gman0046
04-12-2013, 12:28 PM
George Great Great website. It sure brought back memories. The sad part is rodders younger then us never got to experience the early sixties. To me it was the greatest years of hot rodding. It was truly like American Graffiti, drag strips, cruising, looking for hide and street racing..

George Klass
04-12-2013, 12:33 PM
George Great Great website. It sure brought back memories. The sad part is rodders younger then us never got to experience the early sixties. To me it was the greatest years of hot rodding. It was truly like American Graffiti, drag strips, cruising, looking for hide and street racing..

Don't forget about the girls of the '60's. One cannot live on tire smoke alone...:D

71nova
04-12-2013, 12:35 PM
I worked at an Esso station in the sixties. A few customers who put them on their cars came back to complain about only getting 5 to 10 thousand miles.
<script type="text/html" id="overlay_tmpl">
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young'n'poor
04-12-2013, 12:44 PM
I'd love if these were repoped these days!


Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad

George Klass
04-12-2013, 12:45 PM
Until M&H came out with their 7-inch wide Super Stock tire, the tires of choice in the early '60's were either the Atlas Bucron's or the Vogue tires. Both had soft compound treads. I got slightly better results with the Vogue tires but they were more expensive, and only available with white side walls.

falcongeorge
04-12-2013, 02:48 PM
Corky Coker are you lurking? Could be an opportunity. At our track we saw a lot of them when NHRA brought out the "pure stock" classes about 1967. By then they were old stock and hard to find.
X2, but they would have to really be the same, not just hard rubber look-alikes.

cooger
04-12-2013, 03:37 PM
All of V8 tri fives plus some others into '61 tried to get these. Only the "rich kids" could afford new ones. There was a tire warehouse in Houston for defective tires, had 100 thousand or so. We'd search like hell for bucrons, when we found 'em we paid 8-10 apiece, big bucks for lawn mower kids.
----and they made you a winner.
cooger

Gman0046
04-12-2013, 04:12 PM
George, I didn't forget the girls of the sixties. Please read my post again. We spent a lot of time looking for hide which = girls.
Gary

George Klass
04-12-2013, 05:17 PM
George, I didn't forget the girls of the sixties. Please read my post again. We spent a lot of time looking for hide which = girls.
Gary

10-4 on that, Gary. I had never heard about the "hide" deal, must have been a KY thing. I'm from CA, we just called it "pussy" out here, lol.

I'm 74 years old and I've had alot of cars and alot of pussy, and I can tell ya that pussy is ALOT more expensive...:D

hoop98
04-12-2013, 05:17 PM
http://www.vintage-adventures.com/2575-thickbox/1961-atlas-tires-ad-when-the-choice-is-yours.jpg

Country Gent
04-12-2013, 05:39 PM
I found this with Google. It shows them O.K.

The original "Cheater Slick". If you had the HP to spin them, you had to look in the rearview mirror for the black marks, because they made no noise:cool:

Thanks hoop98. Great photo.

hallrods
04-12-2013, 05:48 PM
My dad had them on the dodge look at the pdf

Country Gent
04-12-2013, 06:05 PM
http://i708.photobucket.com/albums/ww88/geoklass/Super%20Stock%20Chevrelot/untitleddyno_zpse9d9ecdb.jpg

Anyone that has ever heard of these tires might also enjoy this website:

http://georgeklass.net/

Georgeklass, What a great collection website. Brings back memories as I was into drag racing in the 60s and seeing Dyno Don, Arnie Beswick, Socks and Martin and others. I scrounched a handfull of 409 rockers one time from Dyno Don, after I pulled the bottoms out of a couple of my 409 rockers at Kinston NC. He had a draw full.

8-Ball
04-12-2013, 06:16 PM
in 1963 i had a 62 ss 409 4 speed. i run the Atlas Bucron tires, they made about 3 revs and hang on. i loved them. i bought them at Standard oil stations. wish i had that car today. in 1965 i had Frank (fab32) build me a 409-425hp i put a set on that but my kids started to arrive and had to get out of the sport. you know how that goes. 8-ball

Heo2
04-12-2013, 06:34 PM
My father worked in a esso station
in 62-63 they sold bucrons. By then
www tires was out of fashion in
Sweden so they sold them cheaper
and mounted the ww on the inside

Atwater Mike
04-12-2013, 06:37 PM
guys if i remember correctly enco turned to exxon? esso was a different company. my uncle had a enco station that changed to exxon in the early 70's.

"Enco" was a West Coast wing of Standard of New Jersey in 1964, which I think WAS ESSO. (ENCO was coined for 'Energy Company', ergo, 'ENCO'.) Its actual parent company was Humble Oil, Texas/Oklahoma...

Our 3 reps (one right after the other, they didn't last long!) said 'ENCO' was only a temporary licensed name to get the West Coast products moving.
55 dude is right...in 3 years it was EXXON.

ENCO's promotional mgmt dinners were second to NONE! Two of them were held at Jack London Square, I still remember that steak. Thicker than the tread on a new Plycron Cushionaire!

(Company men knew the products...)

black 62
04-12-2013, 08:32 PM
in my area bucrons were getting hard to find by late 1961---i thought easy was the term for girls in california---hides pretty era correct other places...

Mr48chev
04-12-2013, 08:42 PM
Wow an old thread brought back to life that is actually interesting.

In the early 70's they were already out of production but the central Texas Dirt track racers hunted them down in the tire piles at tire stores and wrecking yards and they were the tire of choice for many dirt track classes then. They did hook up good though.

jetnow1
04-12-2013, 09:02 PM
I worked in an Esso station in the early 70's- after school job. The mechanic was the son of the owner(also a mechanic). He had served in the marines for 7 years, would have stayed in but his father got sick and he came home to keep the business running.
When he got out of the service he bought a 58 vette with a 283/dual quads. When his
father got well he took a drive from CT to Florida with the vette. He told me about
street racing another vette in Florida and getting beat. He said it was cause the other
vette had the bucron tires and he had put on harder tired for the trip. It was the first time I ever heard of tires having different compounds.

brian26
04-12-2013, 09:17 PM
Have 2 sets myself for this old car

https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/33700_1474895840576_2217012_n.jpg

brian26
04-12-2013, 09:19 PM
^^^The right front is nos^^^^

brian26
04-12-2013, 09:20 PM
By the way, 'Plycrons' were a harder compound. On dirt they were used for longer races on a sandy type soil/clay.

Country Gent
04-13-2013, 10:57 PM
My dad had them on the dodge look at the pdf

Definately different. That had to ride like a Caddy with those long leaf springs!! :cool::cool::cool:

Mark Muffs
04-17-2014, 12:29 AM
guys if i remember correctly enco turned to exxon? esso was a different company. my uncle had a enco station that changed to exxon in the early 70's.

55 Dude your memory is correct. Where I lived in Phoenix ,AZ, Enco stations had re-badged to Exxon and the change was completed by early 1972. I remember as that was my first year in high school & I hated the name change.

In 1995, I went to Canada for the first time & was almost immediately thrown into time warp as I see the name ESSO is still very much alive & well up there, 30+ years after I had last laid eyes on one (except for those in the movies). Also for a few years (up to about 1975) we also had several Husky stations in Phoenix & I would find out in Canada that they are big up in Canada. More time warp, lol.

Mark Muffs
04-17-2014, 12:32 AM
"Enco" was a West Coast wing of Standard of New Jersey in 1964, which I think WAS ESSO. (ENCO was coined for 'Energy Company', ergo, 'ENCO'.) Its actual parent company was Humble Oil, Texas/Oklahoma...

Our 3 reps (one right after the other, they didn't last long!) said 'ENCO' was only a temporary licensed name to get the West Coast products moving.
55 dude is right...in 3 years it was EXXON.

ENCO's promotional mgmt dinners were second to NONE! Two of them were held at Jack London Square, I still remember that steak. Thicker than the tread on a new Plycron Cushionaire!

(Company men knew the products...)


hey Mike--I forgot all about Humble until now--thanks for jogging my memory as I remember several of them when growing up. I can picture at least 2 of them crystal clear as if its 1965 now.

Mark Muffs
04-17-2014, 12:37 AM
Wow an old thread brought back to life that is actually interesting.

In the early 70's they were already out of production but the central Texas Dirt track racers hunted them down in the tire piles at tire stores and wrecking yards and they were the tire of choice for many dirt track classes then. They did hook up good though.

Reading these on this board & sharing the memories is awesome & jogs my memory even more. Only a week ago I stumbled onto a one-horse gas & diesel stop that still had non-digital 1960s-era pumps working (the owner knows how to fix them & has spare parts if needed) & age-wise, he's relatively young still.